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  • 1.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Climate Change and Migration in North Africa: Projections, Impacts, and Implications for Adaptation2022Rapport (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    This policy brief takes a regional perspective based on a rapid review of the extant literature to cascading climate risks and their links with migration in North Africa. Understanding the climate-migration nexus in the context of North Africa is a cornerstone for taking informed decisions and developing strategies to mitigate the adverse impact of climate change, including potential human mobility.

  • 2.
    Bwalya Umar, Bridget
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Adapting to Climate Change Through Conservation Agriculture: A Gendered Analysis of Eastern Zambia2021Inngår i: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 5, artikkel-id 748300Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the use of conservation agriculture (CA) as a climate adaptationstrategy among smallholder farmers in Eastern Zambia. Using 761 household interviewsand 33 focus group discussions (FGDs) with smallholder farmers from six districts, datawas collected on how smallholder farmers in the region experience climate change,what CA practices they had adopted, and benefits and challenges associated withCA practice. Results show that men and women farmers had similar experiences ofclimate change, namely late onset of a shortened rainy season, intra-seasonal droughtand higher temperatures. Farmers’ perceptions of gender-mediated effects of climatechange had important nuances. The three most cited effects of climate change onwomen mentioned by women were lower crop yields, outbreaks of armyworms andreduced livestock fodder. The men thought women were most affected by increasedhunger, lower crop yields and reduced domestic water sources. According to the womenFGDs, men were most affected through reduced crop yields, increases in livestockdiseases and increased hunger. The men self-reported reduced crop yields, reducedwater for livestock and outbreaks of armyworms. Both men and women saw CA ashaving climate change adaptation benefits. For the women, men most benefitted fromCA through the high moisture holding capacity of basins, higher crop yields and reducedlabor requirements through use of oxen ripping. The men most appreciated the highcrop yields, improved soil fertility and reduced costs as less fertilizer is used. The womencited the high moisture holding capacity of basins, high crop yields and improved soilfertility as benefits they most commonly derived from CA, while the men thought thewomen most benefitted from CA through the higher crop yields, improved soil fertilityand crop tolerance to droughts. The study concludes that there is room for CA to serveas a climate smart agricultural system for both men and women smallholder farmers inEastern Zambia. However, this will require addressing important challenges of high weedpressure, high labor demands, and low access to manure, and CA farming implements.The CA package for Zambia should include access to timely climate information andclimate informed crop choices

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 3.
    Martin, Maria A.
    et al.
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Sendra, Olga Alcaraz
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Bastos, Ana
    Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena, Germany.
    Bauer, Nico
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Bertram, Christoph
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bowen, Kathryn
    Melbourne Climate Futures, Melbourne Law School, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
    Brando, Paulo M.
    University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Rudolph, Tanya Brodie
    South Africa Centre for Sustainability Transitions (CST), University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
    Büchs, Milena
    University of Leeds, School of Earth and Environment, Leeds, UK.
    Bustamante, Mercedes
    University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil.
    Chen, Deliang
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cleugh, Helen
    WCRP Joint Scientific Committee (JSC), Canberra, Australia.
    Dasgupta, Purnamita
    International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Denton, Fatima
    United Nations University, Institute for Natural Resources in Africa, Accra, Ghana.
    Donges, Jonathan F.
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Donkor, Felix Kwabena
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography, University of Education-Winneba, Winneba, Ghana.
    Duan, Hongbo
    School of Economics and Management, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Duarte, Carlos M.
    Red Sea Research Center (RSRC), and Computational Biosciences Research Center (CBRC), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Ebi, Kristie L.
    Center for Health and the Global Environment (CHanGE), University of Washington, Washington, USA.
    Edwards, Clea M.
    Global Futures Laboratory, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Engel, Anja
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Fuss, Sabine
    Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC), Berlin, Germany; Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Gaertner, Juliana
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Gettelman, Andrew
    National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO, USA.
    Girardin, Cécile A.J.
    University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Golledge, Nicholas R.
    Antarctic Research Centre, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.
    Green, Jessica F.
    University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Grose, Michael R.
    CSIRO, Canberra, Australia.
    Hashizume, Masahiro
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Hebden, Sophie
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hepach, Helmke
    Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, Hamburg, Germany.
    Hirota, Marina
    Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil.
    Hsu, Huang-Hsiung
    Anthropogenic Climate Change Center, Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Kojima, Satoshi
    Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Miuragun, Hayama, Japan.
    Lele, Sharachchandra
    Centre for Environment & Development, ATREE, Bengaluru, India.
    Lorek, Sylvia
    Sustainable Europe Research Institute, Cologne, Germany; ZOE Institute for Future-Fit economies, Cologne, Germany.
    Lotze, Heike K.
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Matthews, H. Damon
    Concordia University, Montreal, Canada.
    McCauley, Darren
    Erasmus University of Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Mebratu, Desta
    South Africa Centre for Sustainability Transitions (CST), University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa; Addis Ababa University Institute of Technology, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Mengis, Nadine
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Nolan, Rachael H.
    Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia; NSW Bushfire Risk Management Research Hub, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.
    Pihl, Erik
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rahmstorf, Stefan
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Redman, Aaron
    Global Futures Laboratory, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Reid, Colleen E.
    University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA.
    Rockström, Johan
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany; University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Rogelj, Joeri
    Imperial College London, London, UK; International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Saunois, Marielle
    Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, LSCEIPSL (CEA-CNRS-UVSQ), Université Paris-Saclay, Gif sur Yvette, France.
    Sayer, Lizzie
    International Science Council, Paris, France.
    Schlosser, Peter
    Global Futures Laboratory, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Sioen, Giles B.
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Tokyo, Japan; National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Spangenberg, Joachim H.
    Sustainable Europe Research Institute, Cologne, Germany.
    Stammer, Detlef
    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Sterner, Thomas N.S.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stevens, Nicola
    University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Thonicke, Kirsten
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Tian, Hanqin
    International Center for Climate and Global Change Research, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.
    Winkelmann, Ricarda
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany; University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Woodcock, James
    MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Ten new insights in climate science 2021: a horizon scan2021Inngår i: Global Sustainability, E-ISSN 2059-4798, Vol. 4, artikkel-id e25Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-technical summary

    We summarize some of the past year's most important findings within climate change-related research. New research has improved our understanding about the remaining options to achieve the Paris Agreement goals, through overcoming political barriers to carbon pricing, taking into account non-CO2 factors, a well-designed implementation of demand-side and nature-based solutions, resilience building of ecosystems and the recognition that climate change mitigation costs can be justified by benefits to the health of humans and nature alone. We consider new insights about what to expect if we fail to include a new dimension of fire extremes and the prospect of cascading climate tipping elements.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 4. Nabuurs, G-J
    et al.
    Mrabet, R.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Department of Economics, The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Bustamante, M.
    Clark, H.
    Havlik, P.
    House, J.
    Mbow, C.
    Ninan, K. N.
    Popp, A.
    Roe, S.
    Sohngen, B.
    Towprayoon, S.
    Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses (AFOLU)2022Inngår i: Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change / [ed] P.R. Shukla, J. Skea, R. Slade, A. Al Khourdajie, R. van Diemen, D. McCollum, M. Pathak, S. Some, P. Vyas, R. Fradera, M. Belkacemi, A. Hasija, G. Lisboa, S. Luz, J. Malley, Cambridge, UK; New York, NY, US: Cambridge University Press, 2022, s. 747-860Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Ouma, Marion
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Climate adaptation in Kenya: narratives and frames shaping policy and practice2023Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change poses one of the greatest challenges of our time with the impact severely distressing lives and livelihoods particularly in countries of the Global South. In Kenya, climate-related disasters and extreme events have plagued the most vulnerable communities with the most affected as marginalized communities. Through the institutionalization of the Kenya Climate Change Act (2016), the government provides guidance for the climate change response, proposing measures to build resilience and enhance adaptation. Efforts to promote adaption and resilience of communities and households often involve multi-pronged approaches promoted through multi-actor and multi-level action. Besides the provisions of the Act., climate adaptation discourse in the country is shaped through particular narratives which have both international and national contexts. The narratives have developed over time and often overlap, with institutions and individuals working across the different frames. In this paper, we review literature on climate adaptation in Kenya and use it to discuss four of the dominant narratives that shape climate change adaption in the country. The narratives discussed in this paper relate to adaptive capacities, technological and technical, gender and feminist, and climate justice framings. We argue that some narratives have been dominant in shaping adaptation discourse and practice towards certain solutions, and in turn may have obscured and/or subsumed other plausible solutions.

    The working paper was undertaken as part of the gender and social equity research work under ClimBeR – Building Systemic Resilience Against Climate Variability and Extremes. ClimBeR is an initiative of the CGIAR which aims to transform climate adaptation capacity of food and agricultural systems Guatemala, Kenya, Morocco, Philippines, Senegal and Zambia. Its goal is to tackle vulnerability to climate change at its roots and support countries as they adapt and build equitable and sustainable futures.

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  • 6.
    Pihl, Erik
    et al.
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Sweden.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Zelinka, Mark D.
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA.
    Ten New Insights in Climate Science 2020: a Horizon Scan2021Inngår i: Global Sustainability, E-ISSN 2059-4798, Vol. 4Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-technical summary: We summarize some of the past year’s most important findings within climate change-related research. New research has improved our understanding of Earth’s sensitivity to carbon dioxide, finds that permafrost thaw could release more carbon emissions than expected and that the uptake of carbon in tropical ecosystems is weakening. Adverse impacts on human society include increasing water shortages and impacts on mental health. Options for solutions emerge from rethinking economic models, rights-based litigation, strengthened governance systems and a new social contract. The disruption caused by COVID-19 could be seized as an opportunity for positive change, directing economic stimulus towards sustainable investments.

  • 7.
    Swain, Ashok
    et al.
    Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University.
    Bali Swain, Ranjula
    Department of Economics, Uppsala University.
    Themnér, Anders
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Conflict, Displacement and Transformation. Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University.
    Krampe, Florian
    Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University.
    Zambezi River Basin: A Risk Zone of Climate Change and Vulnerability2012Inngår i: New Routes, ISSN 1403-3755, E-ISSN 2000-8082, Vol. 17, nr 3, s. 17-20Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 8.
    Pihl, Erik ()
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Sweden.
    Fisher, Eleanor ()
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Zelinka, Mark D. ()
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA.
    10 New Insights in Climate Science 20202021Rapport (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
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