The Nordic Africa Institute – Publications

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  • 1.
    Bassler,, Arnd
    et al.
    BLE, Germany.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zebeli, Quendrim
    University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.
    Deliverable of Work Package 7: Common Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda2022Report (Other academic)
  • 2. Boesen, Jannik
    et al.
    Havnevik, KjellThe Nordic Africa Institute.Koponen, JuhaniThe Nordic Africa Institute.Odgaard, Rie
    Tanzania: crisis and struggle for survival1986Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is one of the first comprehensive books on the crisis of the Tanzanian economy and society during the 1980s, including the manifestations of the problems and the responses to them at different levels. It frankly examines the long-term causes of the crisis and endeavours to map ways ahead.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 3.
    Friis-Hansen, Esbern
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Seeds for African peasants: peasants' needs and agricultural research - the case of Zimbabwe1995Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The book provides a comprehensive discussion about the role of agricultural seed in sustainable peasant agriculture and concludes by presenting new principles for sustainable poverty-oriented plant breeding.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Hellin, Jon
    et al.
    International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Los Baños, Philippines.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Taylor, Marcus
    Global Development Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston in Ontario, Canada.
    Bhasme, Suhas
    Centre for Water Policy, Regulation and Governance, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India.
    Loboguerrero, Ana María
    Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Rome, Italy.
    Transformative adaptation: from climate-smart to climate-resilient agriculture2023In: CABI Agriculture and Bioscience, ISSN 2662-4044, Vol. 4, no 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to the climate crisis, there has been much focus on climate-smart agriculture (CSA); namely, technologies and practices that enhance adaptation, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and contribute to food security; the so-called triple win. Success has tended to be measured in terms of the number of farmers adopting CSA with less focus given to the impacts especially on human development. CSA can inadvertently lead to‘maladaptation’ whereby interventions reinforce existing vulnerabilities either by beneftting powerful elites or by transferring risks and exposure between groups. Such maladaptive outcomes often stem from overly technical adaptation programming that is driven by external objectives and discounts the social and political dynamics of vulnerability. Increasingly a more nuanced picture is emerging. This reveals how a failure to contextualize CSA in relation to the structural socioeconomic dynamics associated with agricultural systems that render some categories of farmer especially vulnerable to climate change, undermines CSA’s contribution to reducing rural poverty and increasing equity. In response, there is a growing focus on transformative orientations that pursue a more deep-seated approach to social, institutional, technological and cultural change in order to address the structural contributors to vulnerability and diferential exposure to climate risk. Addressing these questions requires a robust consideration of the social contexts and power relations through which agriculture is both researched and practiced. For agriculture to be transformative and contribute to broader development goals, a greater emphasis is needed on issues of farmer heterogeneity, the dangers of maladaptation and the importance of social equity. This entails recognizing that resilience encompasses both agroand socio-ecological dimensions. Furthermore, practitioners need to be more cognizant of the dangers of (i) benefting groups of already better of farmers at the expense of the most vulnerable and/or (ii) focusing on farmers for whom agriculture is not a pathway out of poverty. The success of these approaches rests on genuine transdisciplinary partnerships and systems approaches that ensure adaptation and mitigation goals along with more equitable incomes, food security and development. The greater emphasis on social equity and human well-being distinguishes climate-resilient from climate-smart agriculture.

  • 5.
    Seide, Wondwosen Michago
    The Nordic Africa Institute. Department of Political Science at Lund University.
    The Nuer pastoralists: between large scale agriculture and villagization : a case study of the Lare District in the Gambella Region of Ethiopia2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "Ethiopia has shown encouraging economic development in the past years. The swirls of economic bubbles are impacting the different regions of the country. At the moment, there are several national and regional development projects being implemented in the Gambella Region in Western Ethiopia. However, being part ofthe development scheme of the federal state does not necessarily guarantee that this peripheral region will be integrated and brought closer to the political, cultural and economic core.

    This report is an attempt to contribute to this debate by focusing on two major themes: large-scale agriculture and the villagization programmes. It examines the dynamics of Gambella’s political economy and the process of incorporating the region – and the Nuer transhumant communities in particular – into the national economy. Specifically, it explores how processes of commercial farming investments and the villagization programme impact Nuer pastoralists. A policy recommendation to be concluded from this research is to acknowledge the nexus between two pastoral development approaches – pastoral area development vs. pastoralism development – so as to make them run in tandem without one excluding the other. By recognising them as mutually reinforcing, pastoralism could be promoted while resources are developed."

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6. Sodaitytė, Inga
    et al.
    Šarauskis, Egidijus
    Kriaučiūnienė, Zita
    Kazlauskas, Marius
    Ruiz, Manuel Pérez
    Apolo-Apolo, Enrique
    Pantazi, Xanthoula Eirini
    Díaz, Manuela
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Owusu-Sekyere, Enoch
    Carballido, Jacob
    Whetton, Rebecca
    Almoujahed, Mhd Baraa
    Rangarajan, Aravind Krishnaswamy
    Moshou, Dimitrios
    Mouazen, Abdul M.
    Smart Solutions for Selective Harvesting of Cereals Based on Mycotoxin Content2022In: Žmogaus ir gamtos sauga (Human and nature safety), ISSN 1822-1823, p. 13-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a fungal disease that affects a variety of cereals. FHB is most commonly caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. FHB infected crops can develop a wide variety of mycotoxins, which are very dangerous to humans and animals. FHB is currently being controlled by chemical fungicides, which are very dangerous for the environment and are only effective under certain conditions. Resistant varieties and well-chosen agricultural technologies can help reduce the prevalence of FHB in plants. However, at present there are no fully resistant varieties. The article analyses the possible ways to identify FHB infected areas in winter wheat and barley crops and how this data can be used to map field infestation. For the detection of FHB is used field scanning and analysis of the multispectral or hyperspectral data results on field contamination. According exact field locations affected by FHB, harvesting trajectories can be designed to distinguish between completely uninfected, minimally infected, and heavily infected plants. According to this, the harvest can later be sorted into top quality, medium and low quality.

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