The Nordic Africa Institute – Publications

nai.se
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 146
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abbink, Jon
    et al.
    African Studies Centre, Leiden University.
    Adetula, VictorThe Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria.Mehler, AndreasArnold Bergstraesser Institute.Melber, HenningThe Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. The Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Africa Yearbook Volume 14: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara 20172018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Africa’s Food Security under the Shadow of the Russia-Ukraine Conflict2022In: The Strategic Review for Southern Africa, ISSN 1013-1108, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Russian invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 has emerged as an exogenous shock to global food supply chains, which foreshadows worrying impacts on Africa’s food security and nutrition, and threaten to derail national and global efforts to end hunger and poverty and to achieve sustainable development goals on the continent. This article provides an early assessment of the implications of the invasion for Africa’s food supply chains and food security. Two particularly aggravating factors, which explain the current and likely future impact of the invasion on Africa’s food security are discussed: the timing of the invasion and the two parties involved in the conflict. The article underlines four major channels by which the invasion disrupts African food supply chains: energy markets and shipping routes, availability and prices of agricultural production inputs, domestic food price inflation, and trade sanctions and other financial measures. In addition, the article considers the risk of social and political unrest that disruption to food supply chains and spikes in domestic food prices may inflame. Finally, the paper briefly discusses options for short- and long-term responses by African governments and their development partners to mitigate the repercussions of the conflict on food supply chains, boost food and nutrition security, and build resilience of Africa’s food systems

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Russia's invasion of Ukraine jeopardizes food security in Africa: shocks to global food supply chains could lead to social and political unrest2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Apart from being a humanitarian tragedy, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has also emerged as an exogenous shock to global food supply chains, with severe consequences for many African countries in particular. Four months into the invasion, we can see three main threats to food security in Africa: a disruption to energy markets and shipping routes; a shortage of fertilizers; and the negative ‘third-party’ effects of sanctions imposed on and by Russia.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    preview image
  • 4.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Krautscheid, Lena
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering LTH, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    Environment for Development, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    COVID-19 risk perception and public compliance with preventive measures: Evidence from a multi-wave household survey in the MENA region2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 7, article id e0283412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the association between individuals’ concern about contracting COVID-19 and their compliance with recommended preventive and mitigation measures, namely wearing face masks, maintaining social distancing and handwashing, in the context of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The empirical analysis is based on a panel dataset from the Combined COVID-19 MENA Monitor Household Survey, which was carried out in Jordan, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia and Egypt. Applying a probit estimation technique, a positive and statistically significant association was found between the level of COVID-19 worries and individuals’ compliance with the mitigation measures. Notably, the results revealed that this association followed a “first-up-then-down” trend, showing that compliance with the three mitigation measures rose as individuals’ worries about contracting the virus increased, and then markedly decreased after they had been infected. Socio-demographic characteristics contributing to lower levels of compliance included being male, being over 60, having lower levels of education and having a lower household income. A cross-country analysis revealed remarkable differences between the five countries, with the strongest association between COVID-19 concerns and adherence to mitigation measures observed in Tunisia and Sudan, and the weakest association seen in Jordan and Morocco. Policy implications are outlined for effective risk communication and management during disease outbreaks and public health emergencies to encourage appropriate public health behaviours.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics & Rural Development, Arish University, Al-Arish, Egypt.
    Mensah-Amuakwa, Franklin
    Environment for Development, University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lagerkvist, Carl Johan
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Who moves and who gains from internal migration in Egypt?: Evidence from two waves of a labor market panel survey2022In: Habitat International, ISSN 0197-3975, E-ISSN 1873-5428, Vol. 124, article id 102573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, Egypt has experienced rapid internal migration movements triggered by urbanization, socioeconomic development, and environmental changes. From a literature perspective, few scholarly studies have empirically examined the drivers and welfare impacts of internal migration in Egypt, despite the increasing recognition of its inextricably links to urban sustainability. The present study utilized data from two waves of an Egyptian Labor Market Panel Survey (ELMPS) conducted in 2012 and 2018 and consisting of 63,909 observations to examine factors that determine internal migration decisions and their subsequent welfare effects. The results of the two-stage Heckman selection model indicate that both the determinants of internal migration decisions and welfare outcomes differ appreciably depending on migration stream as well as the socioeconomic characteristics of the migrants. In particular, females were found to be more likely to migrate from rural to urban areas, lending support to the growing literature on the “feminization of migration” in developing countries. The OLS regression results, after correcting for self-selection, make a strong case for the positive welfare gains from internal migration in Egypt. Specially, we found that the welfare gains for older and female migrants are much higher than other age and gender groups. A comparison of the welfare effects between different migration streams shows that all migratory movements were associated with positive and statistically significant welfare gains, except for rural-to-urban migration that was surprisingly found to be associated with significant welfare loss for the migrants. Urban-to-urban migration was found to have the strongest welfare enhancing effects on all migrant groups. The empirical findings underline a number of research and policy implications for a sustainable management of internal migration in Egypt and other countries with similar internal migration trends.

  • 6.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Owusu-Sekyere, Enok
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Agricultural Economics, Extension & Rural Development, University of Pretoria, South Africa; Department of Agricultural Economics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Esmat, Abou-Rehab
    Department of Agricultural Economics, Al-Azhar University, Assiut, Egypt.
    Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic: Perceived risks, management strategies and emerging opportunities for small and medium agri-food enterprises in a developing country2023In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, article id 104045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Covid-19 pandemic has posed unprecedented challenges to small and medium agri-food enterprises (SMAEs) in developing countries. However, research investigating what risks Covid-19 posed to these firms, how they responded, and what business opportunities emerged to SMAEs from the pandemic remains scanty. Drawing on a sample of 166 specialist SMAEs in Egypt, this study addressed these entwined questions by using multiple indicators and multiple causes (MIMIC) and mediation analysis. Our results point out that the Covid-19 pandemic exposed Egyptian SMAEs to complex and multidimensional risks, and caused profound effects on both upstream and downstream stages of their supply chains. In general, Egyptian SMAEs adopted a ‘wait-and-see’ approach to cope with such Covid-19 risks and impacts, which was attributed to their lack of sufficient financial resources to develop risk management strategies and formalize structures to deal with unexpected events. Interestingly, the results showed that several business opportunities emerged from pandemic; but SMAEs' resource disadvantages constrained their capacity to seize and exploit these opportunities. Moreover, we found that mitigation strategies adopted by SMAEs present a mediating factor between perceived Covid-19 risks and perceived business opportunities. Overall, our findings call for a paradigm shift in relation to enterprise risk management in developing countries' SMAEs toward more holistic frameworks to enhance their preparedness to future shocks, make mature operational and strategic management decisions, and exploit strategic opportunities.

  • 7.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics and Rural Development, Arish University, AlArish, Egypt.
    Surry, Yves
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    An econometric investigation of EU's import demand for fresh potato: a source differentiated analysis focusing on Egypt2022In: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, ISSN 2044-0839, E-ISSN 2044-0847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – A better understanding of the determinants of demand through accurate estimates of the elasticityof import demand can help policymakers and exporters improve their market access and competitiveness. This study analyzed the EU’s demand for imported potato from major suppliers between 1994 and 2018, with the aim to evaluate the competitiveness of Egyptian potato.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study adopted an import-differentiated framework to investigatedemand relationships among the major potato suppliers to the EU’s. To evaluate the competitiveness of Egyptian potato on the EU market, expenditure and price demand elasticities for various suppliers werecalculated and compared.

    Findings – The empirical results indicated that as income allocation of fresh potatoes increases, theinvestigated EU markets import more potatoes from other suppliers compared to imports from Egypt. The results show that EU importers may switch to potato imports from other suppliers as the import price ofEgyptian potatoes increases, which enter the EU markets before domestically produced potatoes are harvested.

    Research limitations/implications – Due to data unavailability, the present study relied on yearly data onquantities and prices of EU potato imports. A higher frequency of observations should allow for consideringseasonal effects, and thereby providing a more transparent picture of market dynamics and demand behaviorof EU countries with respect to potato import from various sources of origin.

    Originality/value – The study used a system-wide and source differentiated approach to analyze importdemand. In particular, the empirical approach allowed for comparing different demand models (AIDS,Rotterdam, NBR and CBS) to filter out the superior and most suitable model for that data because the suitabilityand performance of a demand model depends rather on data than on universal criteria.

  • 8.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics & Rural Development, Arish University, Al-Arish, Egypt.
    Zhen, Liu
    School of Business, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China.
    Assessing stakeholder engagement in public spending, green finance and sustainable economic recovery in the highest emitting economies2022In: Economic Change and Restructuring, ISSN 1573-9414, E-ISSN 1574-0277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The generally held belief is that government spending on education and research and development is to bring about direct impacts on the advancement and sustainability of an economy. Nonetheless, this evidence is not prevalent within industrialized and third-world economies, particularly among the foremost ten carbon dioxide releasing economies. Therefore, the OLS and the DEA are used to estimate the relationship between government public spending on research and development plus green economic advancement, utilizing data from several countries between 2008 and 2018. The findings reveal a varying green economic expansion indicator, which is a result of inadequate government programs to deliver results. Subsequently, for types of expenditure where formal juxtaposition can be made, such as RE compared with conventional energy, the authors detect that multipliers on green cost are almost twofold their traditional sources. The point approximate of the multipliers is 1.1–1.7 for green energy financing and 0.4 and 0.7 for conventional energy financing, depending on time and modeling. These results passed all the required sensitivity analyses. They provided backing to the bottom-up analysis, which reveals that controlling global warming, including preventing biodiversity extinction, works hand in hand with creating economic development and advancement. 

  • 9. Adetula, Victor
    et al.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Laakso, Liisa
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Levin, Jörgen
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    The legacy of Pan-Africanism in African integration today2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pan-Africanism was a vital force in the decolonisation and liberation struggles of the African continent. Today, some regional integration initiatives are part of the legacy of Pan-Africanism. Nevertheless, a retreat in Pan-Africanist consciousness justifies the on-going reform of the African Union and other related platforms for African regional integration, peace and development.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    preview image
  • 10.
    Adetula, Victor
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria.
    Osegbue, Chike
    Department of Political Science, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Igbariam Campus, Nigeria.
    Trade and the Economic Partnership Agreements in EU-Africa relations2021In: The Routledge Handbook of EU-Africa Relations / [ed] Toni Haastrup, Luís Mah, Niall Duggan, London: Routledge, 2021, p. 211-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Adu, George
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    What Drives Structural Transformation in Sub-Saharan Africa?2016In: African Development Review, ISSN 1017-6772, E-ISSN 1467-8268, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 157-169Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an empirical assessment of the driving forces behind structural transformation in sub-Saharan Africa, and to further access the role of structural reforms in accounting for cross-country differences in transformation. Evidence from this paper reveals that country specific fundamentals, institutions and policy reforms as well as governance and fiscal reforms are the key drivers of transformation in the region. A set of policy strategies is proposed to engender sustained transformation and development in the region.

  • 12.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Adu Asamoah, Lawrence
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
    An Empirical Analysis of the Determinants of Interest Rates in Ghana2016In: Journal of African Business, ISSN 1522-8916, E-ISSN 1522-9076, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 377-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the determinants of the bank lending rate in Ghana using annual time series data from 1970 to 2013. We found evidence of a long-run equilibrium relationship between the average lending rate charged by commercial banks and its determining factors. In the long run, bank lending rates in Ghana are positively influenced by nominal exchange rates and Bank of Ghana’s monetary policy rate but negatively with fiscal deficit, real GDP and inflation. We also find positive dependence of the bank lending rate on exchange rates, and the monetary policy rate both in the short and long run. Specifically, our findings reveal that the Bank of Ghana’s monetary policy rate and the exchange rate, by far, show strong contemporaneous effects on the average bank lending rate in Ghana.

  • 13.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Alagidede, Paul
    Wits Business School, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Climate, Technological Change and Economic Growth2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the incentive for developing adaptation technology in a world with changing climate within the directed technical change framework. Consistent with the market size effect, we show that technological change will tend to be biased in favour of the sector that employs the greater share of the work force over time, when the inputs are sufficiently substitutable. An economy with dominant climate sensitive sector can maintain sustained economic growth if it is capable of undertaking frontier innovations in the form of adaptation technology that increases the productivity of the inputs employed in the climate sensitive sector

  • 14.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
    Dramani, John Bosco
    Department of Economics, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
    Africa’s mineral economies: breaking their dependence on mining2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dependence of many African economies on a few mineral commodities exposes them to a number of risks, including economic instability, conflict and damaging environmental effects. Structural, institutional and regulatory reforms are needed to break the mineral dependence and promote economic diversification.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    preview image
  • 15.
    Alagidede, Paul
    et al.
    Wits Business School, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Adu, George
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Boakye Frimpong, Prince
    Garden City University College, Kumasi, Ghana.
    The effect of climate change on economic growth: evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa2016In: Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, ISSN 1432-847X, E-ISSN 1867-383X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 417-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a contribution to the empirics of climate change and its effect on sustainable economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Using data on two climate variables: temperature and precipitation, and employing panel cointegration econometric technique of the long- and short-run effects of climate change on growth, we establish that temperatures beyond 24.9 °C would significantly reduce economic performance in SSA. Furthermore, we show that the relationship between real GDP per capita on one hand and temperature on the other is intrinsically nonlinear.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Gun-Britt
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Kooperation i u-land: ett seminarium om Östafrika1966Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Andersson, Per-Åke
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Bigsten, Arne
    Persson, Håkan
    Foreign aid, debt and growth in Zambia2000Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study first discusses the structural problems of Zambia and the policies of adjustment that have been tried. It then uses a computable general equilibrium model to analyse the impact of various strategies with regard to external resource transfers. It compares the impacts of foreign loans or grants to the private and the public sectors, as well as the impact of a turnaround of the country's fortunes with regard to its external terms of trade. The results of the policy analysis show that the scope for growth is highly dependent on the tightness of the external resource constraint.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 18.
    Andræ, Gunilla
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Beckman, Björn
    Union power in the Nigerian textile industry: labour regime and adjustment1998Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nigeria, once a promising and resourceful country, is experiencing economic and political decay. This book highlights the remarkable progress wich has been achieved in spite of this decline. It follows Nigeria´s important textile industry from the heyday of the oilboom through successive phases of adjustment and liberalization. The fo-cus is on the trade unions and the book points to the successful institutionalization of a union-based labour regime. It draws on extensive field work, interviews with managers unionists, workers and massive documentation from internal union sources.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 19.
    Anglin, Douglas
    et al.
    Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada.
    Shaw, TimothyDalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.Widstrand, Carl GöstaThe Nordic Africa Institute.
    Canada, Scandinavia and Southern Africa1978Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In February 1978 a joint Scandinavian-Canadian conference was held in Ottawa. The conference was intended to examine and discuss Canadian and Scandinavian perspectives on and policies towards the states of Southern Africa, and to analyse and compare the different development strategies and political economies that have emerged in the region in recent years. Scholars, officials and activists from Scandinavia, Canada and Africa were invited to attend. The conference was sponsored by the Scandinavian Institute of African Studies, the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University (Ottawa), and the Centre for African Studies at Dalhousie University (Halifax).

    The present volume concentrates on the relations between Canada, Scandinavia and Southern Africa. A companion volume Conflict and Change in Southern Africa, edited by D. Anglin, T. Shaw and C. Widstrand (University Press of America, 1978) incorporates a variety of analyses, perceptions and ideologies and discusses the position of the front - line states, the liberation movements and prospects of change within South Africa.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 20.
    Arkhangelskaya, Alexandra A.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Globalization, Trade and Regional Integration.
    India, Brazil and South Africa Dialogue Forum: A Bridge between Three Continents: Challenges, achievements and policy options2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The India, Brazil and South Africa (IBSA) Dialogue Forum is a trilateral development initiative to promote South-South cooperation and exchange. The forum was launched with the adoptionof the Brasília Declaration in June 2003. Each of the three countries has ambitions to play a leading role in regional and global affairs. The role of the Group of Twenty (G20) in respondingto the global financial crisis reflects growing acceptance of IBSA’s emerging position by the world’s established powers. An analysis of IBSA as a rising global power bloc is therefore critical to understanding the new dimensions of South-South relations, particularly in a post-Cold War world. This policy note addresses IBSA’s framework, principles, achievements and challenges in Africa’s development perspective.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 21.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Land consolidation, canals and apps: reshaping agriculture in Ethiopia2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last 15 years, Ethiopia has seen remarkable economic growth. The agricultural sector is part of this growth, but its proportional contribution to the overall economy has gone down. There is an urgent need to transform Ethiopian agriculture, not least when it comes to the inefficient land laws that impede young people from investing in farmland. This policy note identifies the structural problems that constrain such a transformation and gives recommendations on how they can be addressed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    preview image
  • 22.
    Bhagavan, Malur Ramanna
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Angola's political economy 1975-19851986Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Download the report here.
  • 23.
    Bigsten, Arne
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Danielson, Anders
    Tanzania: is the ugly duckling finally growing up?2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The title of this report is inspired by the great Danish author Hans Christian Andersen who in the child's tale "Den Grimme Ælling" ("The Ugly Duckling") tells the story of a particularly ugly duckling. She is so ugly, in fact, that she is despised and disliked by all other ducks and ducklings. After a long and painful period of time, however, she grows up - but not to become an ugly duck. Instead she becomes a beautiful white swan, admired by all. So Andersen's tale has a happy ending-at least as far as the ugly duckling goes. The major question tackled in this report is whether a similar fate is awaiting Tanzania. Having been something of an enfant terrible since the deep crisis in the early 1980s, economic progress since 1995 provides some hope that the duckling period is Tanzania is finally over.

    The study initially emerged as part of the "Emerging Africa" research program launched by the OECD's Development Centre in 1997. Comments from participants in that research program are gratefully acknowledged, particularly Jean-Claude Berthélemy (project leader), Aristomene Varoudakis and Ludvig Söderlind. Jean Bonvin, President of the Development Centre (until spring, 1999) guided the project from the start. The project was financed by generous grants from the governments of Switzerland and Belgium.

     

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 24.
    Bigsten, Arne
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Durevall, Dick
    The African economy and its role in the world economy2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a broad survey this issue of Current African Issues presents a multifaceted picture of the current state of the African economy. After a period of falling per capita incomes that started in the 1970s, Africa finally saw a turnaround from about 1995. The last few years have seen average per capita incomes in Africa grow by above 3 per cent per year on average, partly due to the resource boom but also due to improved economic policies. Africa receives more aid per capita than any other major region in the world and there is a significantly positive effect of aid on growth. One of the most notable aspects of the current process of globalisation is the increase in trade between Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, particularly China and India. The authors conclude with a call for policy coherence among donors. The politically most problematic areas for policy change of those discussed in the paper are not aid policy but trade policy and the European Union CAP (Common Agricultural Policy). This is a challenge to EU policy makers, since the latter areas are probably the most important to change if we take our commitment to development seriously.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 25.
    Bigsten, Arne
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Kayizzi-Mugerwa, Steve
    Is Uganda an emerging economy?: a report for the OECD project "Emerging Africa"2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of serious external shocks and political destabilisation in part of the country, Uganda has remained a good economic performer since the late 1980s, with over a decade of high per capita growth in excess of three per cent.

    This study concludes that Uganda's medium to long-term success will depend on the achievements in institutional reforms, including raising the quality of the civil service, curbing corruption and implementing an effective regulatory framework. This is important as a poorly functioning public sector is both unable to uphold the rule of law, thus losing the public goodwill necessary for implementing new measures, and a burden on the private sector as it implies increased transaction costs.

    There is a widespread domestic and international concern that the civil strife in the Great Lakes Region might lead Uganda and its neighbours from the path of economic reform back to socio-economic instability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 26.
    Bigsten, Arne
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Kebede, BereketShimeles, Abebe
    Poverty, income distribution and labour markets in Ethiopia2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethiopia is one of the poorest countries in the world with a per capita income of just over US$100. Understanding the causes of the country's widespread poverty is of the utmost importance. Until recently, however, very little household data was available. This study deals with the many aspects of poverty and income distribution in Ethiopia. It analyses the determinants of poverty and how its conditions have changed in both rural and urban areas over time. Rural and urban poverty profiles and the dynamics of poverty are examined, measurements taken of consumption poverty are compared with individual perceptions of poverty, and an analysis is made of the distribution of intra-household expenditure and the dynamics of income distribution. In addition, the functioning of the urban labour market returns to education, and the effects of education on household welfare are investigated. Finally, there is extensive discussion of the wide range of policies that need to be coordinated for poverty reduction in Ethiopia.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT02
  • 27.
    Boesen, Jannik
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Mohele, A. T.
    The "success story" of peasant tobacco production in Tanzania: the political economy of a commodity producing peasantry1979Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book studies how Tanzania in a period of 25-30 years became a tobacco producer and exporter. But its emphasis is on production, and therefore on the producers. It analyses the processes that made Tanzanians into peasant producers of tobacco for the international market. The dynamics of the organization of production under changing conditions of production. The effects on the development of productive forces, reproduction processes and the standard of living among the producers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 28. Brüntrup, Michael
    et al.
    Melber, Henning
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Taylor, Ian
    Africa, regional cooperation and the world market: socio-economic strategies in times of global trade regimes2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Under the regime of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), local and regional policies are increasingly determined by global factors. One example is the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD). It stresses an earlier notion of African Renaissance, which includes the emphasis on collective self-reliance, but at the same time seeks closer cooperation with the global trade system and its international agencies. Bi- and multilateral trade relations between external actors and individual African states or regional blocs are becoming ever more decisive. This is also true of the more recently negotiated Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) in the post-Lomé era of EU-African relations. In light of such trends the question of coherence between trade as aid and other areas of development strategy and cooperation remains to be answered. The contributions to this Discussion Paper reflect upon related matters of socio-economically viable strategies seeking to reconcile the global and the regional in an African perspective. They were originally presented to the Panel 'Regional Cooperation in Sub-Saharan Africa: Between Collective Self-Reliance and Global Trade Regimes'” organised by the Nordic Africa Institute within the 11th General Conference of the European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI) in September 2005 in Bonn.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT02
  • 29.
    Bwalya Umar, Bridget
    et al.
    Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Natural Sciences. University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Chisola, Moses
    Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Natural Sciences. University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Mushili, Beverly M.
    Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Natural Sciences. University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Kunda-Wamuwi, Chibuye Florence
    Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Natural Sciences. University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Kafwamba, David
    Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Natural Sciences. University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Membele, Garikai
    Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Natural Sciences. University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Imasiku, Eunice N. S.
    Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Natural Sciences. University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Load-shedding in Kitwe, Zambia: Effects and implications on household and local economies2021In: Development Southern Africa, ISSN 0376-835X, E-ISSN 1470-3637Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Campbell, Bonnie
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Mining in Africa: regulation and development2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The continent of Africa is rich in minerals needed by Western economies. Yet the mining industry contributes very little to African development.

    Investigating the impact of the 2003 Extractive Industries Review on a number of African countries, the contributors find that a key dimension of the problem lies in the regulatory frameworks imposed on African countries by the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. They aim to convince academics, governments, and industry that regulation needs to be reformed to create a mining industry favourable to social and economic development and environmental protection.

    The book takes a multidisciplinary approach and provides an historical perspective of each country, making it ideal for students of development studies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
    Download (jpg)
    COVER01
  • 31.
    Carlsen, John
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Economic and social transformation in rural Kenya1980Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 32.
    Carlsson, Jerker
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Recession in Africa: background papers to the seminar Africa - which way out of the recession?, Uppsala, September 19821983Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In September 1982 a number of researcers and representatives of the Nordic development agencies as well as members of several international organizations were invited to discuss the nature and origin of the "recession" in Sub-Saharan Africa. In preparing the seminar a number of scholars were invited to write background papers.

    The country case studies and a paper on strategic issues are presented in this volume. By way of an introduction a presentation is given of the World Bank Report "Accelerated Development in Sub-Saharan Africa - An Agenda for Action", and of the Lagos Plan of Action, adopted by the Organization of African Unity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 33.
    Carlsson, Jerker
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    The limits to structural change: a comparative study of foreign direct investments in Liberia and Ghana 1950-19711981Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 34.
    Carlsson, Jerker
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Transnational companies in Liberia: the role of transnational companies in the economic development of Liberia1977Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between the direct-investing foreign companies and the Government of Liberia (GOL). The report emphasis is put on three aspects. Firstly, the direct income-generating effects of the companies. Secondly, The GOL's policy towards these companies and their part in a development strategy. Thirdly, the distribution of purchase of goods and services.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 35.
    Carlsson, Jerker
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute. Department of Peace and Development Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Somolekae, GloriaDepartment of Political Science and Administrative Studies, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana.Van de Walle, NicolasMichigan State University, USA.
    Foreign aid in Africa: learning from country experiences1997Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume reports on the findings of an international research project on aid effectiveness in Africa. Research teams in eight African countries in collaboration with northern research institutes conducted field work to seek to understand why aid often failed to promote development and how it could be improved. The volume provides evidence that Africa's economic crisis has had a devastating effect on aid effectiveness and that too often, donors dominate aid decisions, leaving governments without any sense of ownership over their own development efforts. The volume concludes that to become more effective in the future, aid to Africa will have to find ways to develop more effective public institutions that are able to fully take charge of the development process.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 36.
    Cervenka, Zdenek
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Salih, M. A. Mohamed
    Burundi: a brief survey of the country and its economy and on its investment potential1991Report (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Cheru, Fantu
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Globalization, Trade and Regional Integration.
    Creating a Conducive International Environment for Africa’s Development: China’s role in Global Governance Reform!2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The world is at a critical juncture: there is the opportunity to come together to pursue a common agenda, or it can break into opposing groups based on differences in income, interests, religion or race. Globalisation exacerbates this tension between opportunity and threats. The most keenly felt tension is the sense that globalisation creates greater inequality in an already unequal world. If the world is unequal, then it must be undemocratic as well. As a result, globalisation and democracy come togetheras simultaneous challenges. As far as Africa is concerned, the challenge is how to gain voice in global governance.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 38.
    Cissé, Daouda
    The Nordic Africa Institute, African International Links.
    Globalisation and sustainable Africa-China trade: what role play the African regional organisations?2015Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Ehrenpreis, Dag
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Svensson, Bengt
    Tunisien1972Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Ladda ner boken här.
  • 40.
    Engdahl, Mattias
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Globalization, Trade and Regional Integration.
    Migrant remittances: an overview of global and Swedish flows2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Migrant remittances – money and gifts sent to relatives back home – have attracted increasing international attention. The flow of remittances has become a major source of revenue for developing countries, exceeding the volume of aid. Three recent studies at Uppsala University bring this issue to light in the context of Sweden’s Policy for Global Development.

    Very little has so far been known about the flow of remittances from Sweden; official data indicate an amount exceeding 4 billion kronor in 2006. The real flows are most likely higher; Swedish and international studies estimate that real remittances are 30-50 per cent above the officially recorded amounts. Statistics Sweden (SCB) is recommended to enhance its records of remittances in terms of desirable scope and reliability, for instance regarding specification of the amounts remitted to different countries.

    Remittance flows from Sweden are linked to the remitters’ incomes and, hence, vary with the business cycle. Experience suggests that the ongoing world economic crisis will have a negative impact on remittance flows also from Sweden.

    It is suggested that enhanced knowledge in Sweden about available remittance services and their costs and measures to promote a better functioning remittance market could increase the net value of these money.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT04
  • 41.
    Eriksen, Tore Linné
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Den europeiske unionen, Loméavtalen og Afrika: en oversikt og en kommentert bibliografi1996Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Ladda ner publikationen här.
  • 42.
    Eriksson Skoog, Gun
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Cocoa in post-conflict Liberia: the role of institutions for the development of inclusive agricultural markets2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liberia has a long history of non-inclusive development with dire consequences for its population, in terms of poverty and conflict. This research explores recent trends in the post-war Liberian cocoa market that suggest a possible break with the past. Structural changes in the cocoa market are found to have strengthened the bargaining power of smallholder farmers and increased their market participation on increasingly beneficial terms in a number of ways – such as a larger share of the world-market price and better access to inputs and services. The cocoa market has become more inclusive. The research explains how a series of institutional changes – changes in the formal and informal rules of the game – have contributed to this process and suggests why. It identifies four major causal mechanisms that help us better understand the role that institutions can play in making agricultural markets more inclusive – in Liberia and beyond.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Eriksson Skoog, Gun
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Conflict, Displacement and Transformation.
    Reformed cocoa market benefits Liberian farmers: but watch out for new forms of market power and elite capture2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The business environment for smallholder cocoa farmers in Liberia has improved. Game-changing efforts by the government have increased competition among cocoa buyers and led to higher producer prices. Farmers are also encouraged by new investors to improve the quality of cocoa, for which they earn more. In addition, famers organisations have strengthened their bargaining power. However, policy-makers must be alert to a possible backlash if competion is not ensured, and from elite capture of farmers’ organisations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    preview image
  • 44.
    Fang, Wang
    et al.
    Institute of Agricultural Economics and Information, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
    Yang, Zhenyu
    Institute of Agricultural Economics and Information, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
    Liu, Zhen
    School of Business, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics and Rural Development, Arish University, Arish, Egypt.
    Green recovery of cropland carrying capacity in developed regions: empirical evidence from Guangdong, China2023In: Economic Change and Restructuring, ISSN 1573-9414, E-ISSN 1574-0277, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 2405-2436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper evaluates the carrying capacity of cultivated land in Guangdong Province,China, using the entropy weight method. Ecological and environmental pressuresignificantly impacts capacity, while economic and social factors are stable.Production pressure fluctuates and rises. To improve capacity, we must reduce ecologicaland environmental pressure, protect cultivated land resources, develop andpromote green technology, and maintain water conservation facilities. The resultsindicate that reducing ecological and environmental pressure is essential to improvethe carrying capacity of cultivated land in Guangdong Province. In conclusion, thisstudy highlights the importance of balancing economic growth with environmentalsustainability in developing regions like Guangdong Province. It suggests that aholistic approach that considers ecological, economic, and social factors is necessaryto ensure long-term food security and sustainable land use practices.

  • 45.
    Fold, Niels
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Nylandsted Larsen, Marianne
    Globalization and restructuring of African commodity flows2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    African countries have been incorporated into present processes of economic globalization in a more nuanced way than is usually claimed. Obviously, structural changes and economic growth have not been on the scale seen in other developing country regions, Southeast Asia in particular. However, the increasing global interaction between functionally integrated foci of production and services has also affected Africa in ways that are changing the material foundations of economic and social life on the continent. These processes are not uniform throughout Africa, but affect local, national and regional actors and institutions in diverse and complex ways. In short, globalization in Africa is an uneven process, integrating or re-integrating some localities and communities in global flows of goods, finance and information, while marginalizing or excluding others.

    The aim of this book is to grasp the diversity of these globalization processes in a systematic way by adopting a common analytical framework, the Global Value Chain approach. Commodity-specific data in two or more countries are taken as a point of departure and the variations and similarities in linkages between local, national, regional and global chain segments are examined. The book is based on original quantitative and qualitative data, collected during fieldwork by the authors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Download the book here.
  • 46.
    Gaidzanwa, Rudo B.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Voting with their feet: migrant Zimbabwean nurses and doctors in the era of structural adjustment1999Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research report examines the ways in which medical professionals have responded to the changing environment of work and livelihood in Zimbabwe since the adoption of a structural adjustment programme. Of particular interest are those doctors and nurses who took a decision to migrate from Zimbabwe to Botswana and South Africa in search of "greener" pastures.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 47.
    Gao, Xuan
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Globalization, Trade and Regional Integration.
    The proliferation of anti-dumping and poor governance in emerging economies: case studies of China and South Africa2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Through examination of the alleged rationale of the anti-dumping (AD) instrument, this paper argues that it has little to do with fairness or with level playing fields. AD trade protection enjoys broad political support merely because its convoluted technical complexities prevent all but a few insiders and experts from understanding the reality that underlies the rhetoric, thus enabling inefficient but well-organised domestic producers to safely utilise the instrument to protect themselves from foreign competition, at times in collusion with foreign exporters and with the national AD authorities as a broker. While the best option for AD reform, i.e., complete removal, is not practically available, this paper proposes improving AD’s procedural institutions by enhancing the quality of public governance in the formulation of AD decisions by national authorities. It further examines the AD practices and laws of China and South Africa, arguing that poor governance in emerging economies contributes to their prolific use of AD, usually disproportionate to their small share of world imports. These economies already maintain higher tariff barriers than industrial countries, so that without effective steps to ensure better governance to restrain the arbitrary and proliferating use of AD, they may lose out significantly on the gains from the trade liberalisation for which they have been striving for decades.

    CONTENTS

    Foreword

    1. Introduction

    2. Anti-dumping: Rhetoric vs. Reality

    2.1 The Rehtoric of AD: To Ensure Level Playing Fields by Offsetting Unfair Competition

    2.1.1 The Economic Rationale of Free Trade and Competition

    2.1.2 AD: A Competition-Distorting and Protectionist Instrument

    2.2 AD: Misundertanding, Ignorance and Indifference

    2.2.1 Collaboration between Special Interest Groups and Decision Makers

    3. Harnessing Anti-Dumping: A Good Governance Approach

    3.1 Good Governance in AD Decision Making

    3.2 The Prolific Use of AD by Emerging Economies and the Low Quality of Governance

    3.2.1 AD Desicion Making in China

    3.2.2 AD Decision Formulation in South Africa

    4. Conclusions

    References

     

     

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
    Download (pdf)
    COVER01
  • 48.
    Ghai, Yash P.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Law in the political economy of public enterprise: African perspectives1977Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    The book is available for download here.
  • 49.
    Gibbon, Peter
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Liberalised development in Tanzania: studies on accumulation processes and local institutions1995Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 50.
    Gibbon, Peter
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Markets, civil society and democracy in Kenya1995Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The studies in this volume provide extended empirical analysis of some of the issues at the heart of current social and political changes and divisions: the outcome on the ground of the long fought-over cereals reforms, the changing nature of the local development arena in the multi-party era, and the polarised relation of the churches to political liberalisation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
123 1 - 50 of 146
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf