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  • 1.
    Bwalya Umar, Bridget
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Adapting to Climate Change Through Conservation Agriculture: A Gendered Analysis of Eastern Zambia2021In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 5, article id 748300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the use of conservation agriculture (CA) as a climate adaptationstrategy among smallholder farmers in Eastern Zambia. Using 761 household interviewsand 33 focus group discussions (FGDs) with smallholder farmers from six districts, datawas collected on how smallholder farmers in the region experience climate change,what CA practices they had adopted, and benefits and challenges associated withCA practice. Results show that men and women farmers had similar experiences ofclimate change, namely late onset of a shortened rainy season, intra-seasonal droughtand higher temperatures. Farmers’ perceptions of gender-mediated effects of climatechange had important nuances. The three most cited effects of climate change onwomen mentioned by women were lower crop yields, outbreaks of armyworms andreduced livestock fodder. The men thought women were most affected by increasedhunger, lower crop yields and reduced domestic water sources. According to the womenFGDs, men were most affected through reduced crop yields, increases in livestockdiseases and increased hunger. The men self-reported reduced crop yields, reducedwater for livestock and outbreaks of armyworms. Both men and women saw CA ashaving climate change adaptation benefits. For the women, men most benefitted fromCA through the high moisture holding capacity of basins, higher crop yields and reducedlabor requirements through use of oxen ripping. The men most appreciated the highcrop yields, improved soil fertility and reduced costs as less fertilizer is used. The womencited the high moisture holding capacity of basins, high crop yields and improved soilfertility as benefits they most commonly derived from CA, while the men thought thewomen most benefitted from CA through the higher crop yields, improved soil fertilityand crop tolerance to droughts. The study concludes that there is room for CA to serveas a climate smart agricultural system for both men and women smallholder farmers inEastern Zambia. However, this will require addressing important challenges of high weedpressure, high labor demands, and low access to manure, and CA farming implements.The CA package for Zambia should include access to timely climate information andclimate informed crop choices

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  • 2.
    Hellin, Jon
    et al.
    International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Los Baños, Philippines.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Bonatti, Michelle
    Leibniz Center for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Müncheberg, Germany; Department of Agricultural Economics, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Transforming agricultural research and development systems to meet 21st Century needs for climate action2024In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this opinion piece we address how to ensure that agricultural research for development is fit for purpose for the Twentyfirst Century. We focus on two themes: (i) the urgent need to engage social (together with natural) scientists in transdisciplinary research processes; (ii) the importance of the co-creation of knowledge via more democratic partnerships that genuinely address power asymmetries, as well as different stakeholders' roles (and responsibilities). We highlight discrepancies in the mix of social and natural science agricultural research, and also what may come across as a tepid commitment to partnerships despite the best intentions of many researchers.

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  • 3. J.I., Nagasha
    et al.
    M, Ocaido
    Rajala, E.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Chiwona-Karltun, Linley
    Gender-based approaches for improving milk safety, value addition and marketing among smallholder livestock farmers2024In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of Uganda, this study delves into gender-based strategies aimed at enhancing women's engagement in milk safety, value addition and marketing within smallholder livestock farming. The objectives were twofold: first, to document the current practices of women in milk safety, value addition, and marketing channels; second, to examine the constraints, opportunities, and strategies related to the production of safe milk and milk products, along with accessing sustainable markets. Conducted in four sub-counties of Kiruhura district, this research employed both qualitative participatory methods and structured questionnaires, including twelve focused group discussions and twenty key informant interviews with both women and men. Notably, 217 structured questionnaires were administered. The findings illuminate that women play a central role in milk processing, water provisioning, sanitation, hygiene practices and were the primary contributors to milk value addition, particularly in the production of butter and ghee. Despite their active involvement, women face challenges in accessing adequate milk quantities, employ traditional labor-intensive procedures and encounter difficulties in marketing their processed products. Men, often the household heads, held decision-making authority over milk consumption and control the selling of milk, contributing to gender disparities. Addressing these challenges necessitates comprehensive support, including training and capacity-building initiatives for both men and women in milk value addition, credit access, and market entry. The study underscores the potential for improved women's access to milk quantities, particularly for butter and ghee production, to strengthen rural livelihoods and boost dairy production in Uganda. 

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