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  • 1.
    Abbink, Jan
    et al.
    African Studies Centre, Leiden University.
    Adetula, VictorNordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria.Mehler, AndreasArnold Bergstraesser Institute.Melber, HenningNordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. The Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Africa Yearbook Volume 14: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara 20172018Collection/Antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 2.
    Abbink, Jon
    et al.
    African Studies Centre, Leiden University.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria.
    Mehler, Andreas
    Arnold Bergstraesser Institute.
    Melber, Henning
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. The Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sub-Saharan Africa2018Inngår i: Africa Yearbook Volume 14: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2017 / [ed] Jon Abbink, Victor Adetula, Andreas Mehler and Henning Melber, Leiden: Brill , 2018, s. 3-19Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter summarises major developments in sub-Sahara Africa focusing on the themes of elections, conflicts and the status and performance of sub-Sahara Africa in the world economy.  

  • 3.
    Abraham, Fofana
    et al.
    University of Liberia, Liberia.
    Persson, Henrik
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Themnér, Anders
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Yesterday warlord, today presidential candidate: ex-military leaders running for office in post-civil war societies2019Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In many African countries where civil war raged not so long ago, former warlords are today running for office in elections. This policy note assesses the effect that these warlord democrats have on democratisation and security.

  • 4.
    Adegun, Olumuyiwa
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Federal University of Technology, Akure, Akure, Nigeria ; University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Community engagement key for upgrading informal settlements2019Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Several African countries are tackling the issue of slums and informal settlements by building completely new housing developments. However, many residents view these new areas as less habitable because of poor social conditions. Drawing on three case studies, this policy note argues that community engagement is crucial when planning to replace informal settlements with modern housing in African cities.

  • 5.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria. .
    BOOK REVIEW: Foreign Policy and Leadership in Nigeria: Obasanjo and the Challenge of African Diplomacy2018Inngår i: South African Journal of International Affairs, ISSN 1022-0461, E-ISSN 1938-0275, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 442-444Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 6.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos.
    Environmental Degradation, Land Shortage and Identity Conflicts on the Jos Plateau in Nigeria2015Inngår i: Land in the Struggles for Citizenship in Africa / [ed] Sam Moyo - Dzodzi Tsikata - Yakham Diop, Dakar-Senegal: Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, 2015, s. 37-68Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 7.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Growing mistrust – a threat to democracy in Ghana: opportunities and challenges in the upcoming general elections2016Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In comparison with other African countries, faith in democracy is strong in Ghana. But the legal tussles that followed the last general election in 2012, and the disqualification of some candidates on trifling grounds in the lead-up to this year’s presidential elections, has spurred public mistrust. This policy note issues a warning about hate speech, violent demonstrations and macho-men militias.

  • 8.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Land Ownership, Politics of Belonging and Identity Conflicts in the Jos Metropolis2015Inngår i: Studies in politics and society: journal of the Nigerian Political Science Association, ISSN 2006-9243, Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 67-80Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The conflicts in the Jos metropolis are not different from other identity conflicts over land in Africa. Studies have shown that dispute over environmental resources is not sufficient by itself to cause violence. When it does contribute to violence, it interacts with other political, economic, and social factors. This perspective draws attention to the social, economic and political contexts underlying environmental resource scarcity’s causal role in African conflicts. This is useful for situating the Jos sectarian conflicts within the context of the interplay of political, economic and social forces in the Jos metropolis. The conflicts connect more strongly to a long historical process on the Jos Plateau than some of the immediate problems widely reported in the media. At the centre of this historical process were British colonialism, the growth of the tin mining economy that brought the early Hausa and Fulani migrant labour to Jos, and the struggles over land. The British colonial administration through its policy of Indirect Rule, and the organization of ethnically segregated communities of ‘natives’ and ‘settlers’ created the settler-indigene divide. The Berom, Afizere and Anaguta who see themselves as the ‘first comers’ refer to themselves as ‘indigenes’ while they regard the Hausa and Fulani as ‘later comers’ and derogatorily labelled them as ‘settlers’. Both the indigenes and non-indigenes have always demonstrated strong emotional appeals to historical factors in their autochthonous claims. This paper examines the role of ethnicity, religion and other primordial sentiments in the Jos conflicts including the politics of belonging and how it relates to land ownership. This paper draws data from the author’s close observations of events in the Jos metropolis for a period of over two decades. Informal interviews, events analyses and qualitative data complement historical and contemporary documentary secondary sources on people, economy and politics of the city of Jos.

  • 9.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos.
    Markets, Revolts, and Regime Change: The Political Economy of the Arab Spring2011Inngår i: Nigerian Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 37, nr 2, s. 17-48Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the political economy of the Arab Spring. It draws attention to the economic and social factors underlying the recent uprisings in the Arab world. Essentially the article relates the internal dynamics in the Arab countries with their status and role in the global economy. It also notes especially the rising awareness in the Arab world on the role of the civil society in domestic politics, especially its capacity to demand political and economic change. The article is divided into five sections. The first section introduces the main issues, while the second section conceptually interprets the Arab Spring within the intellectual discourse on social revolution mainly but with a brief overview on regime change and democratic transition. The third section examines the relationship between oil, politics, and economy in the MENA region. The fourth section contains an analysis of the economic crisis and the various adjustment measures adopted by some governments on the eve of the uprisings. The fifth section examines the external dimensions of the Arab Spring including the international responses. The discussion of the lessons learned and policy recommendations concludes the article.

  • 10.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos.
    Measuring democracy and ‘good governance’ in Africa: a critique of assumptions and methods2011Inngår i: Governance in the 21st Century / [ed] Kwandiwe Kondlo, Chinenyengozi Ejiogu, Cape Town: HSRC Press, 2011, s. 10-25Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 11.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria.
    People's Democratic Party and 2015 General Elections: The Morbidity of a Giant2017Inngår i: The Nigerian General Elections of 2015 / [ed] John A.A. Ayoade, Adeoye A. Akinsanya, and Olatunde J.B Ojo, Ibadan, Nigeria: John Archers Publishers , 2017, s. 27-52Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The People’s Democratic Party (PDP) was established in 1998 at the time when Nigeria was under pressure from the international community to undertake political reform in preparation for anticipated return to civil rule. The PDP formed the first government after the country re-introduced civil rule in May 1999 and remained the ruling party at the national level and also in government in the majority of states of the federation until May 2015 when it lost to the All Progressives Congress (APC) in the presidential election, and unexpectedly recorded defeat in the other elections. The climax was on March 28, 2015 when Nigeria held its fifth presidential election and an incumbent president, Dr. Goodluck Jonathan was defeated by retired Major-General Mohammed Buhari who was contesting the presidential election for the fourth time. Apart from its remarkable victory in the previous four successive presidential elections, the PDP had a comfortable majority in the national legislature between 1999 and 2015. However, towards the end of President Obasanjo’s tenure, the party had started to experience disturbing cracks in its internal cohesion. It eventual defeat by the APC at both the presidential and state levels puts an abrupt end to the hegemony of the self-styled “largest political party in Africa” with a vision of “ruling Nigeria for sixty years”. This chapter presents analysis of the remote and immediate causes of the poor performance of the PDP in the 2015 elections. What are the remote and immediate causes of the defeat of the PDP in the 2015 elections? What was the nature of public support for the party and its presidential candidate?  Was the dwindling public support for the party linked to its diagnostic analysis of the challenges of governance and development in the country? What was the role of the Jonathan presidency in the political misfortune of the party? What was the capacity of the party to cope with some of the changes and innovations in the electoral process that may have contributed to the outcomes of the 2015 elections?  How has the PDP faired since the inauguration of the new APC-led government? Is the party adjusting well to playing the role of an opposition party? How well has the party faired in this regard, and what are the lessons learned? And finally, how does the electoral misfortune of the PDP helps us to understand the strength and weaknesses of the democratic institutions in Nigeria? As many are these questions that one consider useful for understanding the party system in modern Nigeria.

  • 12.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Sweden's bid for a UN Security Council seat and what Africa stands to gain2016Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish government should involve the African diaspora in Sweden to secure the support of African countries in the UN. It also needs to clarify in what ways Sweden's feminist foreign policy is compatible with African values of respect and dignity for womanhood. These are a couple of recommendations provided in this policy note on how Sweden should act to improve relations with African countries and succeed in its ambitions to achieve the sustainable development goals of Agenda 2030.

  • 13.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    The future of EU-Africa cooperation beyond the Cotonou agreement2018Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    There is profound concern in large circles in Africa that the Cotonou Agreement obstructs African governments from supporting domestic production, and that the EU is splitting Africa in two by striking separate deals with different African regions. These perceptions are important considerations for those involved in the upcoming negotiations to replace the existing agreement.

  • 14.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos.
    Welfare Associations and the Dynamics of City Politics in Nigeria: Jos Metropolis as Case Study2002Inngår i: Under Siege: Four African Cities Freetown, Johannesburg, Kinshasa, Lagos: Documenta11_Platform 4 / [ed] Okwui Enwezor et al., Ostfildern-Ruit, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2002, s. 259-379Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 15.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria.
    West Africa2018Inngår i: Africa Yearbook Volume 14: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2017 / [ed] Edited by Jon Abbink, Victor Adetula, Andreas Mehler and Henning Melber, Leiden: Brill , 2018, s. 39-47Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter is an overview of major events and key developments in the West African sub-region in 2017.  

  • 16.
    Adetula, Victor A. O.
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Jaiyebo, Olugbemi
    Regional economic communities and peacebuilding in Africa: the experiences of ECOWAS and IGAD2016Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    African states have responded to the challenges of the post-Cold War international system mostly by collectively promoting subregional and continental-wide initiatives in conflict resolution and peacebuilding. Admittedly, the existence of many violent conflicts in Africa, as well as their ‘domino’ effects at thesub-regional level, contributed significantly to the growing desire for collective security systems and conflict management mechanisms. The broadening of the role and functions of African regional organisations to include responsibility for peacebuilding and conflict management generally adds credence to the efficacy of regional integration. Many issues, however, present themselves in the engagement of RECs with the peacebuilding process in Africa. Although primarily set up to promote economic integration, Africa’s RECs have increasingly taken up a prominent role in conflict resolution and peace support operations, as evident in the recent peace processes in Burundi, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Cote d’Ivoire, Zimbabwe, Mali, Congo DRC, Sudan, and South Sudan, among others. In spite of the challenges they face, RECs are capable of playing important roles with regard to peace mediation, peacekeeping and peacebuilding.

  • 17.
    Adetula, Victor
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria. .
    Kamski, BenediktMehler, AndreasMelber, Henning
    Africa Yearbook: Politics, Economy and Society of the South of the Sahara in 20182019Collection/Antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    The Africa Yearbook covers major domestic political developments, the foreign policy and socio-economic trends in sub-Sahara Africa – all related to developments in one calendar year. The Yearbook contains articles on all sub-Saharan states, each of the four sub-regions (West, Central, Eastern, Southern Africa) focusing on major cross-border developments and sub-regional organizations as well as one article on continental developments and one on African-European relations. While the articles have thorough academic quality, the Yearbook is mainly oriented to the requirements of a large range of target groups: students, politicians, diplomats, administrators, journalists, teachers, practitioners in the field of development aid as well as business people.                    

  • 18.
    Adetula, Victor
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Murithi, Tim
    Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Buchanan-Clarke, Stephen
    Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Peace negotiations and agreements in Africa: why they fail and how to improve them2018Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Peace is not just the absence of conflict. The self-interest lying behind external ‘support’ can take many shapes. The pursuit of justice can sometimes thwart peace efforts. And, last but not least, simply adding more women to peace negotiations will not break male-centric norms.

  • 19.
    Adetula, Victor
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria.
    Osegbue, Chike
    Chukwu Emeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Igbariam-Awka, Nigeria.
    Africa, United States and Terrorism: Revisiting Sulayman Nyang on US-Led GlobalWar against Terrorism2018Inngår i: African Intellectuals and State of the Continent: Essays in Honor of Professor Sulayman S. Nyang / [ed] Olayiwola Abegunrin and Sabella Abidde, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018, s. 196-218Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter attempts to address three key questions: First, how is Professor Sulayman Nyang’s scholarly contributions and policy prescriptions understood and responded to in broad intellectual discourse on Africa and international terrorism? Second, what is the status of the war against terrorism in the external relations of Africa states with special attention to relations with the United States and other Western Powers?  Third, what is the relevance of the global war on terrorism in international relations today?   The chapter notes Professor Sulayman Nyang’s contributions to the scholarship on  Islamic militancy, international terrorism and the US-led global war against terrorism including  his deep insights on changes in the international system and Africa. Africa is generally regarded in the West as the weakest link in the war against international terrorism; it is the political territory that can easily be penetrated by international terrorists. African states are poor, weak and corrupt. These failed states do not have effective government that is able to deliver public goods to its population or even exercise control over much of its territory. In this way these states are threat both to their citizens and the international community that comes under risk as a result of possible violent reactions by deprived and frustrated citizens that generate global problems including international terrorism. However, while many African governments have not earned the respect of the Western countries, the latter have maintained close economic relationship with them most arguably for economic and geo-political importance. These strong ties between Africa and Western countries have spill over to the security sector with the United States and other Western Powers providing assistance and support to help African governments develop and manage their anti-terrorist and counter insurgencies strategies.

  • 20.
    Adu, George
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    What Drives Structural Transformation in Sub-Saharan Africa?2016Inngår i: African Development Review, ISSN 1017-6772, E-ISSN 1467-8268, Vol. 28, nr 2, s. 157-169Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an empirical assessment of the driving forces behind structural transformation in sub-Saharan Africa, and to further access the role of structural reforms in accounting for cross-country differences in transformation. Evidence from this paper reveals that country specific fundamentals, institutions and policy reforms as well as governance and fiscal reforms are the key drivers of transformation in the region. A set of policy strategies is proposed to engender sustained transformation and development in the region.

  • 21.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Adu Asamoah, Lawrence
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
    An Empirical Analysis of the Determinants of Interest Rates in Ghana2016Inngår i: Journal of African Business, ISSN 1522-8916, E-ISSN 1522-9076, Vol. 17, nr 3, s. 377-396Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the determinants of the bank lending rate in Ghana using annual time series data from 1970 to 2013. We found evidence of a long-run equilibrium relationship between the average lending rate charged by commercial banks and its determining factors. In the long run, bank lending rates in Ghana are positively influenced by nominal exchange rates and Bank of Ghana’s monetary policy rate but negatively with fiscal deficit, real GDP and inflation. We also find positive dependence of the bank lending rate on exchange rates, and the monetary policy rate both in the short and long run. Specifically, our findings reveal that the Bank of Ghana’s monetary policy rate and the exchange rate, by far, show strong contemporaneous effects on the average bank lending rate in Ghana.

  • 22.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Alagidede, Paul
    Wits Business School, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Climate, Technological Change and Economic Growth2016Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the incentive for developing adaptation technology in a world with changing climate within the directed technical change framework. Consistent with the market size effect, we show that technological change will tend to be biased in favour of the sector that employs the greater share of the work force over time, when the inputs are sufficiently substitutable. An economy with dominant climate sensitive sector can maintain sustained economic growth if it is capable of undertaking frontier innovations in the form of adaptation technology that increases the productivity of the inputs employed in the climate sensitive sector

  • 23.
    Albanese, Marina
    et al.
    University of Naples.
    Navarra, Cecilia
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Tortia, Ermanno
    University of Trento.
    Equilibrium unemployment as a worker insurance device: wage setting in worker owned enterprises2017Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 24.
    Angerbrandt, Henrik
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Stockholm University.
    Deadly elections: post-election violence in Nigeria2018Inngår i: Journal of Modern African Studies, ISSN 0022-278X, E-ISSN 1469-7777, Vol. 56, nr 1, s. 143-167Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Two decades after the ‘third wave of democratization’, extensive violence continues to follow elections in sub-Saharan Africa. Whereas national processes connected to pre-election violence have received increased scholarly attention, little is known of local dynamics of violence after elections. This article examines the 2011 Nigerian post-election violence with regard to the ways in which national electoral processes interweave with local social and political disputes. The most affected state, Kaduna State, has a history of violent local relations connected to which group should control politics and the state. It is argued that electoral polarisation aggravated national ethno-religious divisions that corresponded to the dividing line of the conflict in Kaduna. A rapid escalation of violence was facilitated by local social networks nurtured by ethno-religious grievances.

  • 25.
    Angerbrandt, Henrik
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Inkludering nyckeln för att mota Boko Haram2017Inngår i: Utrikesmagasinet : UI:s forum för analys och opinion, ISSN 2002-746XArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 26.
    Angerbrandt, Henrik
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Nigeria and the Lake Chad Region beyond Boko Haram2017Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of a recent UN Security Council resolution on the Lake Chad region, this policy note identifies major challenges that need to be addressed to create conditions for actors in the region to build a lasting peace. The issues include demobilising local vigilantes and resolving land-related conflicts.

  • 27.
    Angerbrandt, Henrik
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Vaughan, Olufemi: Religion and the Making of Nigeria2018Inngår i: History: Reviews of New Books, ISSN 0361-2759, Vol. 46, nr 2, s. 53-54Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 28. Benabdallah, Lina
    et al.
    Murillo-Zamora, Carlos
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Jos, Nigeria. .
    Global South Perspectives on International Relations Theory.2017Inngår i: International Relations Theory / [ed] Stephen McGlinchey, Rosie Walters , Christian Sc heinpthy, Bristol, England: E-International Relations Publishing , 2017, s. 125-130Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Global South is generally understood to refer to less economically developed countries. It is a broad term that comprises a variety of states with diverse levels of economic, cultural, and political influence in the international order. Although International Relations is an interdisciplinary field of study, it has historically been studied from a very Eurocentric perspective that does not always help us to understand developments occurring in  the  Global  South. Understanding Global South perspectives starts with a discussion of the Western-centric focus of mainstream IR theories. It also recognises the challenges facing scholars from the Global South that might help to explain why Global South perspectives are largely absent from mainstream debates. The ultimate goal is to broaden the field of view within IR theory to incorporate a more just and representative understanding of international relations.The main weakness of mainstream Western IR theories is that they are not universally experienced as mainstream. The concepts they are based on do not unequivocally reflect or match the reality in many Global South states. Furthermore, certain questions that are central to Global South perspectives are absent or under-theorised in mainstream scholarship. Tickner (2016, 1) for example points out that issues of race and empire have been missing from mainstream theories despite the existence of solid scholarship in postcolonial and poststructuralist studies. Curiously, she adds, colonial dominations profoundly shaped the state of the current global order, yet they are not even remotely central to mainstream IR. Today, there is a growing body of scholarship that pays attention to the context of international relations theories in Africa, Asia and Latin America and to the diverse interpretations within these vast regions. Much of this scholarship has been produced under the umbrella term of ‘global IR’.

  • 29.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Conclusion: From Deconstruction to Reconstruction2017Inngår i: State Building and National Identity Reconstruction in the Horn of Africa / [ed] Redie Bereketeab, Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, s. 225-235Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 30.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Djibouti: Strategic Location, an Asset or a Curse2016Inngår i: Journal of African Foreign Affairs, ISSN 2056-564X, Vol. 3, nr 1&2, s. 5-18Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 31.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Eritrea’s refugee crisis and the role of the international community2016Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Five thousand refugees leave Eritrea each month according to UNHCR, making it one of the world’s fastest-emptying countries. In this policy note, Redie Bereketeab, researcher at the Nordic Africa Institute, analyses the role and responsibility of the international community in the Eritrean migration crisis.

  • 32.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Introduction: Challenges of State Building, State Reconstruction and National Identity Reconfiguration2017Inngår i: State Building and National Identity Reconstruction in the Horn of Africa / [ed] Redie Bereketeab, Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 1, s. 3-21Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 33.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Introduction: understanding national liberation movements2017Inngår i: National Liberation Movements as Governments in Africa, New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, s. 3-16Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 34.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    National Liberation Movements as Government in Africa2017Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 35.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Problems of Transition to Civic Governance in Eritrea2017Inngår i: National Liberation Movements as Government in Africa, New York: Routledge, 2017, s. 158-171Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 36.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Regional economic communities and peacebuilding: The IGAD Experience2019Inngår i: South African Journal of International Affairs, ISSN 1022-0461, E-ISSN 1938-0275, Vol. 26, nr 1, s. 137-156Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 37.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    State Building and National Identity Reconstruction in the Horn of Africa2017Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 38.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    State Building and National Identity Reconstruction in the Horn of Africa2017Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 39.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    The Collapse of IGAD Peace Mediation in the Current South Sudan Civil War: When National Interest Dictates Peace Mediation2017Inngår i: Journal of African Foreign Affairs, ISSN 2056-564X, Vol. 4, nr 1 & 2, s. 67-84Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 40.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    The Ethiopia-Eritrea Rapprochement: Peace and Stability in the Horn of Africa2019Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines the Ethiopia–Eritrea rapprochement and asks whether it might lead to peace and stability in the Horn of Africa. The Algiers Agreement (2000) that was mediated by the international community – the UN, OAU, EU and USA (the same parties that also served as witnesses and guarantors) – was supposed to be final and binding. But when the Eritrea–Ethiopia Boundary Commission (EEBC) published its verdict, Ethiopia rejected it on the grounds that it awarded Badme, the flashpoint of the war, to Eritrea. The witnesses and guarantors, abdicating their responsibility, failed to exert pressure on Ethiopia, which led to a situation of ‘no war, no peace’. This stalemate lasted for 16 years, until July 2018. The recent rapprochement is driven by internal dynamics, rather than by external mediation. This has fundamentally reshaped the relationship between the two countries. The impact of the resolution of the Ethiopia–Eritrea conflict goes beyond the borders of the two countries, and has indeed brought fundamental change to the region. Full diplomatic relations have been restored between Eritrea and Somalia; and the leaders of Eritrea and Djibouti have met in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. This all raises the issue of whether a peace deal driven by internal dynamics fares better than one that is externally mediated. The central question that this book attempts to address is: what factors led to the resolution of a festering conflict? The book explains and analyses the rapprochement, which it argues was made possible by the maturing of objective and subjective conditions in Ethiopia and by the trust factor in Eritrea.

  • 41.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    The Intergovernmental Authority on Development: Internal Culture of Foreign Policymaking and Sources of Weaknesses2018Inngår i: African Foreign Policies in International Institutions / [ed] Jason Warner, Timothy M. Shaw, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, s. 113-125Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    The Interplay between National, Regional and International Dynamics in the Production of Conflicts in the Horn of Africa2016Inngår i: Journal of Oromo studies, ISSN 1070-2202, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 53-73Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 43.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    The Role of the International Community in the Eritrean Refugee Crisis2017Inngår i: Geopolitics, History, and International Relations, ISSN 1948-9145, Vol. 9, nr 1, s. 68-82Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the role of the international community in the Eritrean refugee crisis. It critically analyses the international community's, as represented by UN, AU, EU and US, failure to fulfill its obligation. The UN, OAU, EU and US were witnesses and guarantors of the Algiers Agreement. As such, they assumed responsibility of making sure of the implementation of the Ethiopia-Eritrea Border Commission Verdict. The Algiers Agreement empowered the guarantors to invoke UN Chapter VII, if one or both of the parties violates its commitment. Fourteen years later the EEBC Verdict is awaiting implementation with immense consequence to Eritrea. Deriving from text analysis and drawing on previous research I argue in this article that the international community by failing to fulfill its legal obligation contributed to the current Eritrean refugee crisis. It is the contention of this article only the unconditional implementation of the boundary commission that brings peace and stability to the region that would stem the flow of the refugees.

  • 44.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Agricultural transformation in Ethiopia: state policy and smallholder farming2018Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    For thousands of years, Ethiopia has depended on its smallholding farmers to provide the bulk of its food needs. But now, such farmers find themselves under threat from environmental degradation, climate change and declining productivity. As a result, smallholder agriculture has increasingly become subsistence-oriented, with many of these farmers trapped in a cycle of poverty. Smallholders have long been marginalised by mainstream development policies, and only more recently has their crucial importance been recognised for addressing rural poverty through agricultural reform.

    This collection, written by leading Ethiopian scholars, explores the scope and impact of Ethiopia’s policy reforms over the past two decades on the smallholder sector. Focusing on the Lake Tana basin in northwestern Ethiopia, an area with untapped potential for growth, the contributors argue that any effective policy will need to go beyond agriculture to consider the role of health, nutrition and local food customs, as well as including increased safeguards for smallholder’s land rights. They in turn show that smallholders represent a vitally overlooked component of development strategy, not only in Ethiopia but across the global South.

  • 45.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Concluding remarks2018Inngår i: Agricultural transformation in Ethiopia: state policy and smallholder farming / [ed] Atakilte Beyene, London ; Uppsala: Zed Books ; Nordiska Afrikainstutet , 2018, s. 180-185Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 46.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Land consolidation, canals and apps: reshaping agriculture in Ethiopia2019Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last 15 years, Ethiopia has seen remarkable economic growth. The agricultural sector is part of this growth, but its proportional contribution to the overall economy has gone down. There is an urgent need to transform Ethiopian agriculture, not least when it comes to the inefficient land laws that impede young people from investing in farmland. This policy note identifies the structural problems that constrain such a transformation and gives recommendations on how they can be addressed.

  • 47.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Large-scale canal irrigation management by smallholder farmers2018Inngår i: Agricultural transformation in Ethiopia: state policy and smallholder farming / [ed] Atakilte Beyene, London ; Uppsala: Zed Books ; Nordiska Afrikainstutet , 2018, s. 63-79Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 48.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    State policies and questions of agrarian transformation2018Inngår i: Agricultural transformation in Ethiopia: state policy and smallholder farming / [ed] Atakilte Beyene, London ; Uppsala: Zed Books ; Nordiska Afrikainstutet , 2018, s. 1-22Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 49.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Adetula, Victor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Ethiopia in the United Nations Security Council 2017-20182017Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Enforce the ‘African solutions to African problems’ principle in the UN and promote cooperation with the African Union and its regional communities. That is what Ethiopia should work for during its two-year term in the Security Council. To perform on this global stage, the Ethiopian government has to address its domestic democracy and governance issues.

  • 50.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Ngonzo Luwesi, Cush
    University of Kwango.
    Why does Africa need innovative water financing mechanisms?: prologue2018Inngår i: Water finance innovations in context / [ed] Atakilte Beyene and Cush Ngonzo Luwesi, Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, 2018, s. 17-38Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
1234 1 - 50 of 160
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