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  • 1.
    Adetula, Victor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. University of Jos.
    Environmental Degradation, Land Shortage and Identity Conflicts on the Jos Plateau in Nigeria2015In: Land in the Struggles for Citizenship in Africa / [ed] Sam Moyo - Dzodzi Tsikata - Yakham Diop, Dakar-Senegal: Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, 2015, 37-68 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adetula, Victor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Growing mistrust – a threat to democracy in Ghana: opportunities and challenges in the upcoming general elections2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In comparison with other African countries, faith in democracy is strong in Ghana. But the legal tussles that followed the last general election in 2012, and the disqualification of some candidates on trifling grounds in the lead-up to this year’s presidential elections, has spurred public mistrust. This policy note issues a warning about hate speech, violent demonstrations and macho-men militias.

  • 3.
    Adetula, Victor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Land Ownership, Politics of Belonging and Identity Conflicts in the Jos Metropolis2015In: Studies in politics and society: journal of the Nigerian Political Science Association, ISSN 2006-9243, Vol. 3, no 1, 67-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conflicts in the Jos metropolis are not different from other identity conflicts over land in Africa. Studies have shown that dispute over environmental resources is not sufficient by itself to cause violence. When it does contribute to violence, it interacts with other political, economic, and social factors. This perspective draws attention to the social, economic and political contexts underlying environmental resource scarcity’s causal role in African conflicts. This is useful for situating the Jos sectarian conflicts within the context of the interplay of political, economic and social forces in the Jos metropolis. The conflicts connect more strongly to a long historical process on the Jos Plateau than some of the immediate problems widely reported in the media. At the centre of this historical process were British colonialism, the growth of the tin mining economy that brought the early Hausa and Fulani migrant labour to Jos, and the struggles over land. The British colonial administration through its policy of Indirect Rule, and the organization of ethnically segregated communities of ‘natives’ and ‘settlers’ created the settler-indigene divide. The Berom, Afizere and Anaguta who see themselves as the ‘first comers’ refer to themselves as ‘indigenes’ while they regard the Hausa and Fulani as ‘later comers’ and derogatorily labelled them as ‘settlers’. Both the indigenes and non-indigenes have always demonstrated strong emotional appeals to historical factors in their autochthonous claims. This paper examines the role of ethnicity, religion and other primordial sentiments in the Jos conflicts including the politics of belonging and how it relates to land ownership. This paper draws data from the author’s close observations of events in the Jos metropolis for a period of over two decades. Informal interviews, events analyses and qualitative data complement historical and contemporary documentary secondary sources on people, economy and politics of the city of Jos.

  • 4.
    Adetula, Victor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. University of Jos.
    Markets, Revolts, and Regime Change: The Political Economy of the Arab Spring2011In: Nigerian Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 37, no 2, 17-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the political economy of the Arab Spring. It draws attention to the economic and social factors underlying the recent uprisings in the Arab world. Essentially the article relates the internal dynamics in the Arab countries with their status and role in the global economy. It also notes especially the rising awareness in the Arab world on the role of the civil society in domestic politics, especially its capacity to demand political and economic change. The article is divided into five sections. The first section introduces the main issues, while the second section conceptually interprets the Arab Spring within the intellectual discourse on social revolution mainly but with a brief overview on regime change and democratic transition. The third section examines the relationship between oil, politics, and economy in the MENA region. The fourth section contains an analysis of the economic crisis and the various adjustment measures adopted by some governments on the eve of the uprisings. The fifth section examines the external dimensions of the Arab Spring including the international responses. The discussion of the lessons learned and policy recommendations concludes the article.

  • 5.
    Adetula, Victor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. University of Jos.
    Measuring democracy and ‘good governance’ in Africa: a critique of assumptions and methods2011In: Governance in the 21st Century / [ed] Kwandiwe Kondlo, Chinenyengozi Ejiogu, Cape Town: HSRC Press, 2011, 10-25 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Adetula, Victor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Sweden's bid for a UN Security Council seat and what Africa stands to gain2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish government should involve the African diaspora in Sweden to secure the support of African countries in the UN. It also needs to clarify in what ways Sweden's feminist foreign policy is compatible with African values of respect and dignity for womanhood. These are a couple of recommendations provided in this policy note on how Sweden should act to improve relations with African countries and succeed in its ambitions to achieve the sustainable development goals of Agenda 2030.

  • 7.
    Adetula, Victor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. University of Jos.
    Welfare Associations and the Dynamics of City Politics in Nigeria: Jos Metropolis as Case Study2002In: Under Siege: Four African Cities Freetown, Johannesburg, Kinshasa, Lagos: Documenta11_Platform 4 / [ed] Okwui Enwezor et al., Ostfildern-Ruit, Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2002, 259-379 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Adetula, Victor A. O.
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Jaiyebo, Olugbemi
    Regional economic communities and peacebuilding in Africa: the experiences of ECOWAS and IGAD2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    African states have responded to the challenges of the post-Cold War international system mostly by collectively promoting subregional and continental-wide initiatives in conflict resolution and peacebuilding. Admittedly, the existence of many violent conflicts in Africa, as well as their ‘domino’ effects at thesub-regional level, contributed significantly to the growing desire for collective security systems and conflict management mechanisms. The broadening of the role and functions of African regional organisations to include responsibility for peacebuilding and conflict management generally adds credence to the efficacy of regional integration. Many issues, however, present themselves in the engagement of RECs with the peacebuilding process in Africa. Although primarily set up to promote economic integration, Africa’s RECs have increasingly taken up a prominent role in conflict resolution and peace support operations, as evident in the recent peace processes in Burundi, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Cote d’Ivoire, Zimbabwe, Mali, Congo DRC, Sudan, and South Sudan, among others. In spite of the challenges they face, RECs are capable of playing important roles with regard to peace mediation, peacekeeping and peacebuilding.

  • 9.
    Adu, George
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Amporfu, Eugenia
    Does Stock Market Development Enhance Private Investment in Ghana?2016In: International Journal of Humanities and Social Science Research, ISSN 2371-1655, Vol. 2, 68-78 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper investigates the extent to which stock market development enhances private investment in Ghana. Quarterly times series data for the period 1991(Q1) to 2011(Q4) are used. Stock market development is proxy by market capitalization. The paper adopts the Dynamic Ordinary Least Squares (DOLS) method of estimation. The results for deposit interest rates, GDP per capita, and public investment confirm complementarity hypothesis, accelerator principle, as well as “crowding-in” effect for Ghana in the long-run in their respective cases. Market capitalization also increases private investment in the long-run. However, inflation reduces private investment. In the short-run, one quarter lag and two quarters lag values of private investment and public investment respectively increases private investment, while one quarter lag value of market capitalization reduces current levels of private investment. The paper recommends further development of the stock market since doing so will attract more investors and ultimately enhance private investment.

  • 10.
    Adu, George
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Natural resource revenues and public investment in resource-rich economies in sub-Saharan Africa2016Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general policy prescription for resource-rich countries is that, for sustainable consumption, a greater percentage of the windfall from resource rents should be channelled into accumulating foreign assets such as a sovereign public fund as done in Norway and other developed but resource-rich countries. This might not be a correct policy prescription for resource-rich sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries, where public capital is very low to support the needed economic growth. In such countries, rents from resources serve as opportunity to scale-up the needed public capital. Using panel data for the period 1990–2013, we find in line with the scaling-up hypothesis that resource rents significantly increase public investment in SSA and that this tends to depend on the quality of political institutions. We also find evidence of a positive effect of public investment on economic growth, which also depends on the level of resource rents. Using some of the components of public investment, such as health and education expenditure, we find a negative effect of resource rents, suggesting among other things that public spending of resource rents is directed more to other infrastructure investments.

  • 11.
    Adu, George
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    What Drives Structural Transformation in Sub-Saharan Africa?2016In: African Development Review, ISSN 1017-6772, E-ISSN 1467-8268, Vol. 28, no 2, 157-169 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an empirical assessment of the driving forces behind structural transformation in sub-Saharan Africa, and to further access the role of structural reforms in accounting for cross-country differences in transformation. Evidence from this paper reveals that country specific fundamentals, institutions and policy reforms as well as governance and fiscal reforms are the key drivers of transformation in the region. A set of policy strategies is proposed to engender sustained transformation and development in the region.

  • 12.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Adu Asamoah, Lawrence
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
    An Empirical Analysis of the Determinants of Interest Rates in Ghana2016In: Journal of African Business, ISSN 1522-8916, E-ISSN 1522-9076, Vol. 17, no 3, 377-396 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the determinants of the bank lending rate in Ghana using annual time series data from 1970 to 2013. We found evidence of a long-run equilibrium relationship between the average lending rate charged by commercial banks and its determining factors. In the long run, bank lending rates in Ghana are positively influenced by nominal exchange rates and Bank of Ghana’s monetary policy rate but negatively with fiscal deficit, real GDP and inflation. We also find positive dependence of the bank lending rate on exchange rates, and the monetary policy rate both in the short and long run. Specifically, our findings reveal that the Bank of Ghana’s monetary policy rate and the exchange rate, by far, show strong contemporaneous effects on the average bank lending rate in Ghana.

  • 13.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Alagidede, Paul
    Climate, Technological Change and Economic Growth2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the incentive for developing adaptation technology in a world with changing climate within the directed technical change framework. Consistent with the market size effect, we show that technological change will tend to be biased in favour of the sector that employs the greater share of the work force over time, when the inputs are sufficiently substitutable. An economy with dominant climate sensitive sector can maintain sustained economic growth if it is capable of undertaking frontier innovations in the form of adaptation technology that increases the productivity of the inputs employed in the climate sensitive sector

  • 14.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
    Alagidede, Paul
    University of the Witwatersrand.
    Boakye Frimpong, Prince
    Garden City University College.
    The effect of climate change on economic growth: evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa2016In: Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, ISSN 1432-847X, E-ISSN 1867-383X, Vol. 18, no 3, 417-436 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a contribution to the empirics of climate change and its effect on sustainable economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Using data on two climate variables: temperature and precipitation, and employing panel cointegration econometric technique of the long- and short-run effects of climate change on growth, we establish that temperatures beyond 24.9 °C would significantly reduce economic performance in SSA. Furthermore, we show that the relationship between real GDP per capita on one hand and temperature on the other is intrinsically nonlinear.

  • 15.
    Angerbrandt, Henrik
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Nigeria and the Lake Chad Region beyond Boko Haram2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of a recent UN Security Council resolution on the Lake Chad region, this policy note identifies major challenges that need to be addressed to create conditions for actors in the region to build a lasting peace. The issues include demobilising local vigilantes and resolving land-related conflicts.

  • 16.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Djibouti: Strategic Location, an Asset or a Curse2016In: Journal of African Foreign Affairs, ISSN 2056-564X, E-ISSN2056-5658, Vol. 3, no 1&2, 5-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Eritrea’s refugee crisis and the role of the international community2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Five thousand refugees leave Eritrea each month according to UNHCR, making it one of the world’s fastest-emptying countries. In this policy note, Redie Bereketeab, researcher at the Nordic Africa Institute, analyses the role and responsibility of the international community in the Eritrean migration crisis.

  • 18.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    State Building and National Identity Reconstruction in the Horn of Africa2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    The Collapse of IGAD Peace Mediation in the Current South Sudan Civil War: When National Interest Dictates Peace Mediation2017In: Journal of African Foreign Affairs, ISSN 2056-564X, Vol. 4, no 1 & 2, 67-84 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    The Interplay between National, Regional and International Dynamics in the Production of Conflicts in the Horn of Africa2016In: Journal of Oromo studies, ISSN 1070-2202, Vol. 22, no 1, 53-73 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bereketeab, Redie
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    The Role of the International Community in the Eritrean Refugee Crisis2017In: Geopolitics, History, and International Relations, ISSN 1948-9145, Vol. 9, no 1, 68-82 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the role of the international community in the Eritrean refugee crisis. It critically analyses the international community's, as represented by UN, AU, EU and US, failure to fulfill its obligation. The UN, OAU, EU and US were witnesses and guarantors of the Algiers Agreement. As such, they assumed responsibility of making sure of the implementation of the Ethiopia-Eritrea Border Commission Verdict. The Algiers Agreement empowered the guarantors to invoke UN Chapter VII, if one or both of the parties violates its commitment. Fourteen years later the EEBC Verdict is awaiting implementation with immense consequence to Eritrea. Deriving from text analysis and drawing on previous research I argue in this article that the international community by failing to fulfill its legal obligation contributed to the current Eritrean refugee crisis. It is the contention of this article only the unconditional implementation of the boundary commission that brings peace and stability to the region that would stem the flow of the refugees.

  • 22.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Adetula, Victor
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Ethiopia in the United Nations Security Council 2017-20182017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Enforce the ‘African solutions to African problems’ principle in the UN and promote cooperation with the African Union and its regional communities. That is what Ethiopia should work for during its two-year term in the Security Council. To perform on this global stage, the Ethiopian government has to address its domestic democracy and governance issues.

  • 23.
    Bjarnesen, Jesper
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Between Labor Mígration and Forced Displacement: Wartime Mobilities in the Burkina Faso-Côte d'Ivoire Transnational Space2016In: Conflict and Society, ISSN 2164-4551, Vol. 2, no 1, 52-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The significant number of involuntary returns of labor migrants to Burkina Faso is a relatively neglected aspect of the armed confl ict in Côte d’Ivoire. Between 500,000 and 1 million Burkinabe migrants were forced to leave Côte d’Ivoire between 2000 and 2007, placing tremendous pressure on local communities in Burkina Faso to receive and integrate these mass arrivals, and causing those returning labor migrants an acute sense of displacement. Th is article analyzes the experiences of displacement and resettlement in the context of the Ivorian crisis and explores the dialectics of displacement and emplacement in the lives of involuntary labor migrant returnees; their young adult children; and Burkinabe recruits returning aft er their service in the Forces Nouvelles rebel forces in Côte d’Ivoire.

  • 24.
    Bjarnesen, Jesper
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Zouglou Music and Youth in Urban Burkina Faso: Displacement and the Social Performance of Hope2017In: Hope and Uncertainty in Contemporary African Migration / [ed] Nauja Kleist and Dorte Thorsen, London: Routledge, 2017, 58-75 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Bjarnesen, Jesper
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Erdman Vigh, Henrik
    University of Copenhagen.
    Introduction: The Dialectics of Displacement and Emplacement2016In: Conflict and Society, ISSN 2164-4551, Vol. 2, no 1, 9-15 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wars unsettle our commonsense understandings of movement and mobility. Simultaneously entropic and inertial, they conjure up images of rampant disorder and chaos as well as strained and crippled formations locked in negative tension. On the one hand, detrimental movement; on the other, deadly stalemate. Both mobility and immobility are, as such, associated with the iconography of warfare and confl icts. Th ey may be presented as out of time through pictures of empty streets, ruins, trenches, and dead bodies frozen in contorted positions, yet, conversely, some of the most archetypical images of war connote speed, fl ows, and movement, seen in images of troop advances or retreats, rows of traveling refugees, and hauls of humanitarian aid shipped or fl own into airports and harbors from afar. In temporal terms, confl ict and violence are oft en represented in the lethargy of decay or the entropy of aggression.

  • 26.
    De Coning, Cedric
    et al.
    NUPI.
    Gelot, LinnéaThe Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Göteborgs universitet.Karlsrud, JohnNUPI.
    The future of African peace operations: from the Janjaweed to Boko Haram2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facing threats ranging from Islamist insurgences to the Ebola pandemic, African regional actors are playing an increasingly vital role in safeguarding peace and stability across the continent. But while the African Union has demonstrated its ability to deploy forces on short notice and in difficult circumstances, the challenges posed by increasingly complex conflict zones have revealed a widening divide between the theory and practice of peacekeeping. With the AU ’s African Standby Force becoming fully operational in 2016, this timely and much-needed work argues that responding to these challenges will require a new and distinctively African model of peacekeeping, as well as a radical revision of the current African security framework.

    The first book to provide a comprehensive overview and analysis of African peace operations, The Future of African Peace Operations gives a long overdue assessment of the ways which peacekeeping on the continent has evolved overthe past decade. It will be a vital resource for policy makers, researchers and all those seeking solutions and insights into the immense security challenges which Africa is facing today.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. FOI Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut .
    Who put the 'Post' in the Post-Arab Spring?: Towards a Fresh Narrative for North Africa2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When will we see a regional UN headquarter for migration in Rabat, or a centre of excellence for ocean studies in Tripoli? In this policy note, NAI researcher Mikael Eriksson recommends outside-the-box thinking, in an effort to gain a fresh perspective on a region that may have lost its spring-time energy, but not the idea itself – or the people behind it.

  • 28.
    Eriksson Skoog, Gun
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Cocoa in post-conflict Liberia: the role of institutions for the development of inclusive agricultural markets2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liberia has a long history of non-inclusive development with dire consequences for its population, in terms of poverty and conflict. This research explores recent trends in the post-war Liberian cocoa market that suggest a possible break with the past. Structural changes in the cocoa market are found to have strengthened the bargaining power of smallholder farmers and increased their market participation on increasingly beneficial terms in a number of ways – such as a larger share of the world-market price and better access to inputs and services. The cocoa market has become more inclusive. The research explains how a series of institutional changes – changes in the formal and informal rules of the game – have contributed to this process and suggests why. It identifies four major causal mechanisms that help us better understand the role that institutions can play in making agricultural markets more inclusive – in Liberia and beyond.

  • 29.
    Gelot, Linnéa
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Civilian protection in Africa: How the protection of civilians is being militarized by African policymakers and diplomats2017In: Contemporary Security Policy, ISSN 1352-3260, E-ISSN 1743-8764, Vol. 38, no 1, 161-173 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how the protection of civilians is being militarized by African policymakers and diplomats. I draw on practice approaches to analyze what social groups are doing when they claim to “protect civilians.” I show how innovative protection mechanisms can be seen as a function of officials and diplomats coping with the changing circumstances of increasingly militarized politics in Africa. Specifically, accountability mechanisms for unintended and intended civilian harm by African security operations have originated in connection with this development. I argue that these are results of anchoring practices, which means that everyday informal interactions in one context become linked to another context. I argue that these emerging accountability mechanisms represent a new combination of practices, with the potential of changing the routine activities and mutual learning between policymakers and diplomats.

  • 30.
    Gelot, Linnéa
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    The Role and Impact on the African Union2016In: Political Rationale and International Consequences of the War in Libya / [ed] Dag Henriksen and Ann Karin Larssen, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 269-285 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Gelot, Linnéa
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Göteborgs universitet.
    Brosché, Johan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Fröjmark, Henrik
    ”Carl Bildt sprider allvarliga felaktigheter”2016In: Svenska dagbladetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Hellsten, Sirkku
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Afrikkalainen filosofia ja rasismi2017In: Rasismi ja filosofia / [ed] Jani Sinokki, Turku: Eetos , 2017, 147-165 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Hellsten, Sirkku
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Deconstructing the myth of the African middle class2016In: The rise of Africa's middle class: myths, realities and critical engagements, London ; Uppsala: Zed Books ; Nordiska Afrikainstitutet , 2016, 95-109 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Hellsten, Sirkku
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Rheotric and Politics of 'New Africa'2016In: Théories de la justice: Justice globale, agents de la justice et justice de genre : Semininaires doctoraux de Youndé; Yaoundé PhD seminars 2012-2014 / [ed] Ernest-Marie Mbonda and Thierry Ngosso, Louvain-la-Neuve: Presses universitaires de Louvain , 2016, 83-95 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hellsten, Sirkku
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Transitional Justice, Gender Programming, and the UNSCR 1325: African Context and the case of Kenya2016In: Journal of International Development, ISSN 0954-1748, E-ISSN 1099-1328, Vol. 28, no 3, 360-375 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines the implementation of UNSCR 1325 ‘Women, Peace, and Security’ within the framework of post-colonial feminism. The author argues that in current international development co-operation, there is a need for deeper understanding of the complex, context-relevant social and political power structures and processes that prevent gender programming from enhancing gender justice. As an empirical case study the article discusses the challenges that the implementation of the UNSCR 1325 has been facing in Kenya.

  • 36.
    Hellsten, Sirkku
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Palmer, Eric
    Editorial2016In: Journal of Global Ethics, ISSN 1744-9626, E-ISSN 1744-9634, Vol. 12, no 2, 123-126 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Mohamed Nour, Samia Satti
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Faculty of Economic and Social Studies, University of Khartoum.
    Africa bridging the digital divides2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Africa’s leapfrogging information and communication technology development is fueled by mobile broadband. The number of mobile-broadband subscriptions on the continent has increased more than 15 times over the past six years, a growth rate that is three times the global average. However, there are also worrying trends, such as a growing digital divide between men and women, and between urban and rural areas.

  • 38.
    Mususa, Patience
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Udelsmann Rodrigues, CristinaThe Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Africa's urban future: conference report, Helsinki 12 May 20172017Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Prehistoric Ethics: Comment to Liv Nilsson Stutz’ article2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, 65-70 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Rainfed agriculture, drought and hunger in Tanzania2016In: A History of Water, Series 3, Volume 3. Water and Food: From Hunter-Gatherers to Global Production in Africa / [ed] Terje Tvedt & Terje Oestigaard, London: I.B. Tauris, 2016, 332-354 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Water, national identities and hydro-politics in Egypt and Ethiopia2016In: Land and Hydro-politics in the Nile River Basin: Challenges and New Investments / [ed] Sandström, E., Jägerskog, A. & Oestigaard, T., London: Routledge, 2016, 211-230 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Sandström, EmilAnders, Jägerskog
    Land and Hydropolitics in the Nile River Basin: Challenges and New Investments2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nile River Basin supports the livelihoods of millions of people in Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan and Uganda, principally as water for agriculture and hydropower. The resource is the focus of much contested development, not only between upstream and downstream neighbours, but also from countries outside the region. This book investigates the water, land and energy nexus in the Nile Basin.

    It explains how the current surge in land and energy investments, both by foreign actors as well as domestic investors, affects already strained transboundary relations in the region and how investments are intertwined within wider contexts of Nile Basin history, politics and economy. Overall, the book presents a range of perspectives, drawing on political science, international relations theory, sociology, history and political ecology.

  • 43.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Sandström, Emil
    Jägerskog, Emil
    Changing challenges: new hydro-political landscapes in the Nile Basin2016In: Land and Hydro-politics in the Nile River Basin: Challenges and New Investments / [ed] Sandström, E., Jägerskog, A. & Oestigaard, T., London: Routledge, 2016, 1-13 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Tvedt, Terje
    A History of Water, Series 3, Vol. 3: Water and Food: From Hunter-Gatherers to Global Production in Africa.2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All societies must manage their water resources. From the early civilizations of the Indus valley, nearly 5,000 years ago, to today’s megacities, meeting the water needs of an urban population remains a perpetual task. How a society manages and controls its water resources - whether for food and farming, drinking, sanitation, power or transport – plays a formative role in its development. And never more so than in our own century, with the global population approaching seven billion and the continuing threat of climate change.

    As concerns over global water resources continue to grow, the pioneering History of Water series brings a much needed historical perspective to the relationship between water and society. Covering all aspects of water and society - social, cultural, political, religious and technological - the volumes reveal how water issues can only be fully understood when all aspects are properly integrated. Unprecedented in its geographical coverage and unrivalled in its multidisciplinary span, the History of Water series makes a unique and original contribution to a key contemporary issue.

  • 45.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Tvedt, Terje
    Approaches to African Food Production in a Water Society Systems Perspective.2016In: A History of Water, Series 3, Volume 3. Water and Food: From Hunter-Gatherers to Global Production in Africa / [ed] Terje Tvedt & Terje Oestigaard, London: I.B. Tauris, 2016, 1-25 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46. Palmer, Eric
    et al.
    Hellsten, Sirkku
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Editorial2016In: Journal of Global Ethics, ISSN 1744-9626, E-ISSN 1744-9634, Vol. 12, no 1, 1-5 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Sjögren, Anders
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    From rural rebellions to urban riots: political competition and changing patterns of violent political revolt in Uganda2017In: Commonwealth and Comparative Politics, ISSN 1466-2043, E-ISSN 1743-9094, Vol. 55, no 1, 22-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violent political revolt has been common in independent Uganda. For a long time such revolts were exclusively expressed as rural-based rebel groups fighting the government. Since the mid-2000s, however, this seems to have come to an end. Instead, urban riots, very rare in the past, have become much more common. This article analyses the changing patterns of types and location of violent political revolt in Uganda under the National Resistance Movement. It argues that the earlier prevalence of rural rebellions can be explained by the combination of a coercive and militarised state, and weak and ethnically factionalised political forces who took their violent resistance to rural regional bases. Over time, however, government counter-insurgency became more effective and the conditions for insurgency were undermined by withdrawal of external support. Furthermore, the reintroduction of multi-party politics in 2005 opened up new avenues for political expression. The changes to the political system were however more nominal than real in many respects. While the rebel option had become less attractive and feasible, a series of social, economic and political grievances remained which were only partly channelled through party politics. They also found expression through sporadic urban violent revolt.

  • 48.
    Sjögren, Anders
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Oloo, Onyango
    Patel, Shailja
    State, Civil Society and Democracy in Kenya: Kenyans for Peace with Truth and Justice (KPTJ) and the Political Crisis of 2007-20082017In: Democracy, Constitutionalism, and Politics in Africa: Historical Contexts, Developments, and Dilemmas / [ed] Eunice N. Sahle, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 265-295 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Themnér, Anders
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för freds- och konfliktforskning.
    Introduction: warlord democrats : wartime investments, democratic returns?2017In: Warlord democrats in Africa: ex-military leaders and electoral politics / [ed] Anders Themnér, London ; Uppsala: Zed Books ; Nordiska Afrikainstutet , 2017, 1-40 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Themnér, Anders
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för freds- och konfliktforskning.
    Warlord democrats in Africa: ex-military leaders and electoral politics2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-war democratization has been identified as a crucial mechanism to build peace in war-ridden societies, supposedly allowing belligerents to compete through ballots rather than bullets. A byproduct of this process, however, is that military leaders often become an integral part of the new democratic system, using resources and networks generated from the previous war to dominate the emerging political landscape.

    The crucial and thus-far overlooked question to be addressed, therefore, is what effect the inclusion of ex-militaries into electoral politics has on post-war security. Can 'warlord democrats' make a positive contribution by shepherding their wartime constituencies to support the building of peace and democracy, or are they likely to use their electoral platforms to sponsor political violence and keep war-affected communities mobilized through aggressive discourses?

    This important volume, containing a wealth of fresh empirical detail and theoretical insight, and focussing on some of Africa's most high-profile political figures – from Paul Kagame to Riek Machar to Afonso Dhlakama – represents a crucial intervention in the literature of post-war democratization.

12 1 - 50 of 63
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