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  • 1.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Adu Asamoah, Lawrence
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
    An Empirical Analysis of the Determinants of Interest Rates in Ghana2016Inngår i: Journal of African Business, ISSN 1522-8916, E-ISSN 1522-9076, Vol. 17, nr 3, 377-396 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the determinants of the bank lending rate in Ghana using annual time series data from 1970 to 2013. We found evidence of a long-run equilibrium relationship between the average lending rate charged by commercial banks and its determining factors. In the long run, bank lending rates in Ghana are positively influenced by nominal exchange rates and Bank of Ghana’s monetary policy rate but negatively with fiscal deficit, real GDP and inflation. We also find positive dependence of the bank lending rate on exchange rates, and the monetary policy rate both in the short and long run. Specifically, our findings reveal that the Bank of Ghana’s monetary policy rate and the exchange rate, by far, show strong contemporaneous effects on the average bank lending rate in Ghana.

  • 2.
    Adu, George
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.
    Alagidede, Paul
    University of the Witwatersrand.
    Boakye Frimpong, Prince
    Garden City University College.
    The effect of climate change on economic growth: evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa2016Inngår i: Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, ISSN 1432-847X, E-ISSN 1867-383X, Vol. 18, nr 3, 417-436 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a contribution to the empirics of climate change and its effect on sustainable economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Using data on two climate variables: temperature and precipitation, and employing panel cointegration econometric technique of the long- and short-run effects of climate change on growth, we establish that temperatures beyond 24.9 °C would significantly reduce economic performance in SSA. Furthermore, we show that the relationship between real GDP per capita on one hand and temperature on the other is intrinsically nonlinear.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Gun-Britt
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet.
    Kooperation i u-land: ett seminarium om Östafrika1966Collection/Antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 4.
    Cissé, Daouda
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, African International Links.
    Globalisation and sustainable Africa-China trade: what role play the African regional organisations?2015Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 5.
    Engdahl, Mattias
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Globalization, Trade and Regional Integration.
    Migrant remittances. An overview of global and Swedish flows2009Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Migrant remittances – money and gifts sent to relatives back home – have attracted increasing international attention. The flow of remittances has become a major source of revenue for developing countries, exceeding the volume of aid. Three recent studies at Uppsala University bring this issue to light in the context of Sweden’s Policy for Global Development.

    Very little has so far been known about the flow of remittances from Sweden; official data indicate an amount exceeding 4 billion kronor in 2006. The real flows are most likely higher; Swedish and international studies estimate that real remittances are 30-50 per cent above the officially recorded amounts. Statistics Sweden (SCB) is recommended to enhance its records of remittances in terms of desirable scope and reliability, for instance regarding specification of the amounts remitted to different countries.

    Remittance flows from Sweden are linked to the remitters’ incomes and, hence, vary with the business cycle. Experience suggests that the ongoing world economic crisis will have a negative impact on remittance flows also from Sweden.

    It is suggested that enhanced knowledge in Sweden about available remittance services and their costs and measures to promote a better functioning remittance market could increase the net value of these money.

  • 6.
    Eriksson Skoog, Gun
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Cocoa in post-conflict Liberia: the role of institutions for the development of inclusive agricultural markets2016Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Liberia has a long history of non-inclusive development with dire consequences for its population, in terms of poverty and conflict. This research explores recent trends in the post-war Liberian cocoa market that suggest a possible break with the past. Structural changes in the cocoa market are found to have strengthened the bargaining power of smallholder farmers and increased their market participation on increasingly beneficial terms in a number of ways – such as a larger share of the world-market price and better access to inputs and services. The cocoa market has become more inclusive. The research explains how a series of institutional changes – changes in the formal and informal rules of the game – have contributed to this process and suggests why. It identifies four major causal mechanisms that help us better understand the role that institutions can play in making agricultural markets more inclusive – in Liberia and beyond.

  • 7.
    Eriksson Skoog, Gun
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Conflict, Displacement and Transformation.
    Reformed cocoa market benefits Liberian farmers: but watch out for new forms of market power and elite capture2015Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The business environment for smallholder cocoa farmers in Liberia has improved. Game-changing efforts by the government have increased competition among cocoa buyers and led to higher producer prices. Farmers are also encouraged by new investors to improve the quality of cocoa, for which they earn more. In addition, famers organisations have strengthened their bargaining power. However, policy-makers must be alert to a possible backlash if competion is not ensured, and from elite capture of farmers’ organisations.

  • 8.
    Hellsten, Sirkku K.
    University of Dar es Salaam.
    Africa humanism in re-conceptualization of global development: bringing ethics back to governance2013Inngår i: Zanzibar Yearbook of Law, Vol. 3, 3-24 s.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 9.
    Holmqvist, Göran
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Globalization, Trade and Regional Integration.
    Fertility impact of social transfers in Sub-Saharan Africa - What about pensions2010Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential link between child-related cash transfers and increased fertility is often raised asan issue of concern when debating their use. Old-age pension is a form of cash transfer wheretheory would suggest the opposite impact, i.e. pensions equal decreasing fertility. A handful ofSub-Saharan African countries have introduced non-contributory social pensions that cover thegreat majority of the older population. It makes them into a distinct group in relation to the rest ofthe region where public old-age security arrangements, if existing at all, are largely reserved forthe formal sector. This paper attempts to trace any impact these high-coverage pensionschemes may have had on fertility. Findings suggest that there has been such an impact, in therange of 0,5 to 1,5 children less per woman depending on model specification.

  • 10.
    Holmqvist, Göran
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Globalization, Trade and Regional Integration.
    HIV and Income Inequality: If there is a link, what does it tell us?2009Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a striking variation in the prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among countries and regions of the world, with a distinct geographical pattern. This paper explores the link between income inequality and HIV. It presents empirical evidence—a meta-study and additional cross-country regression results—that clearly support the argument that such a link exists. The interpretation of this link is an open issue. Four different hypotheses are discussed, each one pointing out a transit route from income inequality to HIV. The paper presents preliminary evidence on these routes and identifies potential areas for future research.

  • 11.
    Holmqvist, Göran
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Globalization, Trade and Regional Integration.
    Impact of the Financial crisis on Africa: The unpredictable flows: remittances and aid2009Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The forecast of economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa have repeatedly been revised downwards over the last 6 months. It has now reached 2% which is close to a third of what it was a year ago, implying negative growth in per capita terms. Considerable uncertainties remain in these forecasts. Oil- and mineral exporters are likely to take a severe first hit, as collapsing commodity prices translate to reduced export revenues and foreign direct investments are paralyzed. Two additional flows that connect Africa to the global economy, where impact is harder to predict, are aid and remittances. This note explores how these flows have reacted in OECD countries during previous episodes of severe financial crises. It is shown that if these past episodes serve as a guide to the present, then a considerable reduction is to be expected. Remittances would react immediately, while the impact on aid would be lagged but being more prolonged. Given that projection, the critical need for more of accountability in international aid commitments is discussed.

  • 12.
    Isaksson, Ann-Sofie
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Migration, mobility and transnational relations.
    Neighbours and family first: donors should consider the effects of political favouritism in Africa2015Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In many African countries it is a known fact that a person belonging to the same ethnic group as the president is less likely to be treated unfairly by the government. The same is valid for people living in the president’s home region, regardless of their ethnic affiliation. Ethnic and regional favouritism are two distinct but parallel problems. This Policy Note, drawn from data involving 20 000 citizens in 15 African countries, explore the scope of favouritism and its implications for citizens and democratic attitudes.

  • 13. Nellis, John R.
    Who pays tax in Kenya?1972Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 14.
    Philip, Kjeld
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet.
    Den östafrikanska gemenskapen1969Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 15.
    Roy, Sumit
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, African International Links.
    China and India, "rising powers" and African development: challenges and opportunities2014Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report, the challenges and opportunities arising from the growing ties between two key “Rising Powers,” China and India, and Africa are more fully explored. This trend has given rise to speculative, exaggerated and ideological responses and a mixture of anxiety and hope. What is needed is an interdisciplinary political economy study to investigate the ways in which global, regional and national linkages in the relationship impact on the prospects of sustainable development in Africa. The necessity for this is underscored by the growing influence of the BRICS group (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) in reshaping the world.In this frame, the focus is on the nature of the shift in China’s and India’s strategic vision of Africa in terms of politics, ideology and economic development. This shift impinges on trade and investment and, in turn, the scope for inducing structural economic change in the context of colonial and postcolonial tensions. Comparative observation of countries in Eastern and Southern Africa, particularly Ethiopia in the former, illustrates their capacity to cope with the new powers. This is a critical aspect of the continent’s complex interplay with states and institutions within and beyond its borders. Ultimately, African nations have to individually and collectively confront the challenges and opportunities stemming from their evolving relationships with these Rising Powers.

1 - 15 of 15
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