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  • 1.
    Adjei, Prince Osei-Wusu
    et al.
    Department of Geography and Rural Development, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Agyei, Frank Kwaku
    Department of Silviculture and Forest Management, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Adjei, Joyce Osei
    Department of Agricultural Economics, Agribusiness and Extention, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Decentralized forest governance and community representation outcomes: analysis of the modified taungya system in Ghana2018In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Margaret, Sraku-Lartey
    et al.
    Ghana.
    Daniel, Buor
    Ghana.
    Adjei, Prince Osei-Wusu
    Department of Geography and Rural Development, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Foli, Ernest G.
    Ghana.
    Perceptions and knowledge on climate change in local communities in the Offinso Municipality, Ghana2018In: Information Development, ISSN 0266-6669, E-ISSN 1741-6469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is considered to be a significant threat that faces mankind in this century. In Ghana, it isexpected to have a significant effect on agriculture and other climate dependent livelihoods in all ten regionsof the country. The development and implementation of policies on climate change in Ghana require theincorporation of local people’s perception and knowledge of the risks they are exposed to. A study to assessthe perceptions and knowledge of climate change was undertaken in the Offinso Municipality in Ghana. The study used a cross-sectional design where the information gathered represented what was going on at onepoint in time. Respondents (307) were selected from Kwapanin, Koforidua, Kyebi, Sampronso and Anyinasusocommunities using the systematic sampling method. The study used questionnaires, focus group discussionsand targeted interviews to collect primary information on local people’s perception on climate change. Theanalysis used descriptive statistics (frequency and percentages) and chi-square to detect any associationbetween demographic characteristics of local people and their perception of climate change. In addition theknowledge levels of respondents on climate change was analysed. The results indicate that perception ofclimate change is not influenced by origin, gender or level of education; however, it is significantly influencedby age. A knowledge portfolio showed that local people did not have in-depth knowledge on climate change ingeneral. There is therefore the need to create awareness and sensitize local people on causes, indicators andeffects of climate change.

  • 3.
    Prince, Peprah
    et al.
    Department of Geography and Rural Development, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Gyasi, Razak M.
    African Population and Health Research, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Adjei, Prince Osei-Wusu
    Department of Geography and Rural Development, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Williams, Agyemang-Duah
    Department of Geography and Rural Development, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Religion and Health: exploration of attitudes and health perceptions of faith healing users in urban Ghana2018In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, article id 18:1358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The main aim of the study was to explore the attitudes and health perceptions of faith healing usersin Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana. This has become necessary because faith healing practice is an important areabut remains neglected in the health care literature. In an age when biowestern medicine is touted as the cure for most diseases, understanding how and why individuals seek alternative treatment, specifically faith healingmodalities may help to develop more effective health care interventions. Methods: We employed exploratory study design of purely qualitative research approach involving 40 conveniently selected participants from four different purposively selected faith healing centres to get a maximum variation of experiences and opinions on the time of consultation, perceived effectiveness and challenges of faith healing practices in Ghana. In-depth interviews were conducted from 10th June to 30th July, 2017. Data were thematically analysed and presented based on the a posteriori inductive reduction approach. Results: The main findings were that faith healers served as the first port of call for disease curing and prevention formost users. Consumers of faith healing perceived their health status to be good due to the perceived effectiveness offaith healing for curing of health problems. However, users faced challenges such as stigmatisation and victimisation inseeking health care. Conclusion: This study has provided the first baseline evidence in this important area of inquiry that has beenneglected in the scholarly discourse in Ghana. By implication, users’ positive attitudes and perceptions toward faithhealing call for integration policies that allow formal medical services to have open idea to faith healing practices in Ghana.

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