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  • 1.
    Fisher, E.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet. University of Reading.
    #Reset2021 - Maintaining transdisciplinary teamwork through a pandemic2021Annet (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    A reflection on change to trans-disciplinary team-working through the Covid-19 pandemic, demonstrating both flexibility in adapting to new ways of working and frustration in not being able to undertake essential fieldwork. All underlining how transdisciplinary team working needs energy, trans-disciplinary skills, and imagination to capture opportunities for sustainable transformation.

  • 2.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    University of Reading.
    Mapping Academic Literature on Governing Inclusive Green Growth in Africa: Geographical Biases and Topical Gaps2020Inngår i: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, nr 5, s. 1956-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the capacity for credible, salient and legitimate knowledge production is crucial to support African countries in developing their economies and societies inclusively and sustainably. Here, we aim to quantify the current and historic capacity for African knowledge production to support African development and identify important topical gaps. With a focus on topics relating to Governing Inclusive Green Growth in Africa (GIGGA), our research mapped how much Africa-focused research is being produced, from where and which African countries have higher or lower supply; and the topical focus of the research, mapping it against the African GIGGA policy discourses visible in government strategies. To do this we undertook a systematic review using a two-stage process, mapping the literature for GIGGA. This resulted in 960 verified citations. Content analysis of core metadata and article abstracts enabled mapping of the research focus. The analysis revealed a significant role for South Africa as both the pre-eminent producer of GIGGA literature as well as the geographic focus of GIGGA research, with Nigeria, Ethiopia and Kenya representing emerging loci of credible, African-relevant knowledge production. Topically, there was a strong emphasis on development, policy and environment while topics important for growth that is inclusive in character were infrequent or absent. Overall the results reinforced the view that investment is needed in research on inclusive green growth, linked to capacity building for knowledge production systems in Africa. Furthermore, from a policy perspective, policy makers and academics need to actively explore best to collaborate to ensure that academic research informs government policy.

  • 3.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Reading, UK.
    Social Equity in Climate-Resilient Agriculture2022Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This briefing paper provides an overview of what is "social equity" and how it's applicability for climate-resilient agriculture in the context of the need for transformative adaptation.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 4.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    University of Reading.
    Uganda: Gold as a (Trans) National Treasure2020Inngår i: Global Gold Production Touching Ground: Expansion, Informalization and Technological Innovation / [ed] Boris Verbrugge and Sara Geenen, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, s. 225-244Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the potential of its known gold deposits, Ugnda has no history of large-scale gold mining. Instead, the story of gold focuses largely on informal artisanl and small-scale mining (ASGM) and on the gold trade that extends through the region. Recent changing global trends in gold investment are stimulating the expansion of both refining and industrial extraction. Here we explore how these trends become articulated in the Ugandan context, with a focus on ASGM. Reflecting nationalistic discourse and new planning priorities, government today characterizes gold as a "national treasure" and an engine for development transformation. To this end, and in line with initiatives promoted by multilateral agencies, it seeks to encourage the industrial sector compled with the formalisation of small-scale gold mining. These formalisation dynamics are embedded within a semi-authoritarian regime privileges a (trans)national elite whose interests in gold extend into mining and into (trans)national trade and refining. Against this background, we echo a familiar story where institutional and regulatory capacity is weak, namely that formalisation privileges some gold miners but also reinforces inequalities, undermining potential for equity and discounting the value of the sector for people’s livelihoods.

  • 5.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Brondizio, Eduardo
    Department of Anthropology, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, USA.
    Boyd, Emily
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Critical Social Science Perspectives on Transformations to Sustainability2022Inngår i: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 55, s. 1-11, artikkel-id 101160Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces a special issue on the contribution ofsocial science to addressing transformations to sustainability. Articles underline the importance of embracing theoretically rooted, empirically informed, and collaboratively generated knowledge to address sustainability challenges and transformative change. Emphasis is placed on the role of thesocial sciences in elaborating on the politicisation and pluralisation of transformation processes and outcomes, helping situate, frame, reflect and generate societal action, while acknowledging the complexity of societal transformationin different contexts.

  • 6.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    de Theije, Marjo
    Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Araujo, Carlos H. X.
    NAP Mineração, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Calvimontes, Jorge
    NEPAM, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
    van de Camp, Esther
    Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    D'Angelo, Lorenzo
    Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Italy.
    Lanzano, Cristiano
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Luning, Sabine
    Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Massaro, Luciana
    Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Mello, Januária
    NEPAM, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
    Ouédraogo, Alizèta
    Institute for Social Research in Africa, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
    Robert J., Pijpers
    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    de Moraes, Raíssa Resende
    Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; NEPAM, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
    Sawadogo, Christophe
    Atelier Maan Neere, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
    Tuhumwire, Margaret
    Environmental Women in Action for Development, Entebbe, Uganda.
    Twongyirwe, Ronald
    Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Mbarara, Uganda.
    The lifeways of small-scale gold miners: Addressing sustainability transformations2023Inngår i: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 82, artikkel-id 102724Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-scale gold mining sustains millions of people’s lives and yet it stimulates environmental harms and social conflicts. Global environmental crises drive calls for fundamental change to how people live on the planet. For small-scale gold mining, this raises questions about whether current dynamics can provide a basis for sustainability transformations. Proposing the notion of gold lifeways to focus on the lived experience of mining and gold resources as relational phenomena, we ask what sustainability looks like from different miners’ perspectives and probe the practice dynamics of current transformation. Our methodology is social science-led and transdisciplinary. From multi-sited and trans-regional research between South America and Africa, we draw cases from Suriname, Guinea Conakry, and Uganda. Our study finds that gold lifeways give expression to different strands of sustainability: sustaining everyday life in mining; discourses framing mining practices; and government repression of mining. Hence, as our empirical data demonstrates, miner perspectives on sustainability gain content not in isolation, but as part of gold lifeways embedded within different contexts and shaped by societal dynamics. Ultimately, the transformative potency of small-scale gold mining is located in personal lives and precarious dynamics rather than glittering promises of a sustainable future.

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  • 7.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Reading, United Kingdom.
    Luning, Sabine
    Leiden University, The Netherlands.
    D'Angelo, Lorenzo
    University of Reading, United Kingdom.
    Araujo, Carlos HX
    NAP Mineração, University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Arnaldi di Balme, Luigi
    Institute for Social Research in Africa, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
    Calvimontes, Jorge
    NEPAM, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil.
    van de Camp, Esther
    Leiden University, The Netherlands.
    da Costa Ferreira, Lúcia
    NEPAM, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil.
    Lanzano, Cristiano
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Massaro, Luciana
    NEPAM, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil; Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ouédraogo, Alizèta
    Institute for Social Research in Africa, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
    Mello, Januária Pereira
    NEPAM, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil.
    Pijpers, Robert J.
    University of Hamburg, Germany.
    Obodai Provencal, Nii
    Nuku Studios, Accra, Ghana.
    Resende de Moraes, Raíssa
    NAP Mineração, University of São Paulo, Brazil; Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Sawadogo, Christophe
    Institute for Social Research in Africa, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
    de Theije, Marjo
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    de Tomi, Giorgio
    NAP Mineração, University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Tuhumwire, Margaret
    Environmental Women in Action for Development, Entebbe, Uganda.
    Twongyirwe, Ronald
    Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda.
    Transforming matters: sustaining gold lifeways in artisanal and small-scale gold mining2021Inngår i: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 49, s. 190-200Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth strategies in mining regions promote gold extraction based on industrial mining, associating Artisanal and Small-scale Gold Mining (ASGM) with persistent informality. Against this background, we consider how to approach transformations to sustainability in ASGM. Acknowledging how problematic this topic is for sustainability debates, given how ASGM is associated with a host of environmental and social problems, we argue that a justice lens demands we confront such challenges within the global politics of sustainability. This leads us to review advances in the study of ASGM, linked to debates on extractivism, resource materialities, and informality. We use the notion of gold lifeways to capture how the matter of mining shapes different worlds of extraction. We argue that consideration of the potential for transformations to sustainability needs to be grounded within the realities of ASGM. This necessitates giving value to miners’ knowledge(s), perspectives and interests, while recognising the plurality of mining futures. Nevertheless, we conclude that between the immediacy of precarious work and the structural barriers to change in ASGM, the challenges for transformation cannot be underestimated.

  • 8.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Luning, Sabine
    University of Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Obodai, Nii
    Nuku Studios, Ghana.
    Araujo, Carlos H. X.
    Universidade de Sao Paulo, Centre for Responsible Mining, Brazil.
    Calvimontes, Jorge
    NEPAM, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil.
    Camp, Ester van de
    University of Leiden, The Netherlands.
    D'Angelo, Lorenzo
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
    Lanzano, Cristiano
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Massaro, Luciana
    NEPAM, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil.
    Mello, Januaria P.
    NEPAM, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil.
    Resende de Moraes, Raissa
    NEPAM, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil.
    Ouedraogo, Alizeta
    Institute for Social Research in Africa, Burkina Faso.
    Pijpers, Robert J.
    University of Hamburg, Germany.
    Sawadogo, Christophe
    Burkina Faso.
    Theije, Marjo de
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Tuhumwire, Margaret
    Environmental Women in Action for Development, Uganda.
    Twongyirwe, Ronald
    Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda.
    Gold Matters: Visualizing Mining Worlds2023Bok (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    A book of photographs that centre on visualizing mining worlds, notably the worlds of artisanal and small-scale gold miners working in the Brazilian and Surinamese Amazon, and in parts of West and East Africa. Often this gold mining is portrayed in negative, stereotyped, and homogenizing ways. Since miners typically operate in the shadows of the law, their lifeways are remote from the public eye. Visualization by means of photgraphy helps bring to light the diversity of mining terrains and the close connections between miners and these terrains. Images presented in the book are the result of collaboration with gold miners for a project "Sustainability Transformations in Artisanal and Small-scale Gold Mining: Trans-Regional and Multi-Actor Perspectives" (2018-2022).

  • 9.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Ohenjo, Nyang'ori
    Center for Minority Rights Development (CEMIRIDE), Kenya.
    Ng'endo, Mary
    CGIAR Research Initiative on Climate Resilience.
    Hellin, Jon
    International Rice Research Institute, Los Baños, Philippines.
    Preserving heritage, nurturing progress, raising social equity: policy advice on how indigenous peoples can advance sustainable agriculture in Kenya2023Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognising and including the knowledge and leadership of indigenous peoples in building resilient food systems is crucial for equitable transformation. Kenyan decision makers must empower indigenous peoples to engage in local climate adaptation and agricultural sector planning, and at the same time protect those peoples’ rights.

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  • 10. Hellin, J.
    et al.
    Fisher, E.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet. University of Reading.
    Loboguerrero, Ana Maria
    Creating Opportunities for Transformative Climate Change Adaptation by Farmers2021Annet (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 11.
    Hellin, Jon
    et al.
    International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Los Baños, Philippines.
    Amarnath, Giriraj
    International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Colombo, Sri Lanka.
    Challinor, Andrew
    University of Leeds, School of Earth & Environment, Leeds, UK.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Girvetz, Evan
    Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Nairobi, Kenya.
    Guo, Zhe
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington D.C., USA.
    Hodur, Janet
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington D.C., USA.
    Loboguerrero, Ana Maria
    Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Rome, Italy.
    Pacillo, Grazia
    Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Rome, Italy.
    Rose, Sabrina
    Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Nairobi, Kenya; Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Cali, Colombia.
    Schutz, Tonya
    Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Nairobi, Kenya.
    Valencia, Lina
    Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Cali, Colombia.
    You, Liangzhi
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington D.C., USA.
    Transformative adaptation and implications for transdisciplinary climate change research2022Inngår i: Environmental Research: Climate, E-ISSN 2752-5295, Vol. 1, artikkel-id 023001Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The severity of the climate challenge requires a change in the climate response, from an incrementalto a more far-reaching and radical transformative one. There is also a need to avoid maladaptationwhereby responses to climate risk inadvertently reinforce vulnerability, exposure and risk for somesections of society. Innovative technological interventions are critical but enabling social,institutional and governance factors are the actual drivers of the transformative process. Bringingabout this transformation requires inter- and transdisciplinary approaches, and the embracing ofsocial equity. In this Perspective, we unpack what this means for agricultural research and, based onour collective experience, we map out a research agenda that weaves different research componentsinto a holistic and transformative one. We do not offer best practice, but rather reflections on howagricultural research can more readily contribute to transformative adaptation, along with thepersonal and practical challenges of designing and implementing such an agenda. 

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  • 12. Hellin, Jon
    et al.
    Balie, Jean
    Fisher, Eleanor
    University of Reading.
    Blundo-Canto, Genowefa
    Meah, Nafees
    Kohli, Ajay
    Connor, Melanie
    Sustainable agriculture for health and prosperity: stakeholders' roles, legitimacy and modus operandi2020Inngår i: Development in Practice, ISSN 0961-4524, E-ISSN 1364-9213, Vol. 30, nr 7, s. 965-971Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Food systems need to focus more on health, prosperity, and environmental sustainability. This requires changes in what, where, how and by whom food is produced, marketed, and consumed. Interdisciplinary research and transdisciplinary collaboration are needed. Stakeholders need to agree on their respective roles, values, responsibilities and modus operandi so that research better responds to real-world challenges and opportunities. This viewpoint argues that this is especially the case in the Global South post Covid-19. Without these changes, there will continue to be unrealistic expectations of impact from agricultural research, and disappointment when these are not realised.

  • 13.
    Hellin, Jon
    et al.
    Sustainable Impact Platform, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Metro Manila, Philippines.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Reading.
    Balié, Jean
    Agri-Food Policy Platform, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Metro Manila, Philippines.
    Sander, Bjoern Ole
    Sustainable Impact Platform, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Kohli, Ajay
    Strategic Innovation Platform, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Metro Manila, Philippines.
    Scaling Climate-Smart Agriculture Through Interdisciplinary Research-for-Development: Learning from South and Southeast Asia's Rice-Based Systems2021Inngår i: Handbook of Climate Change Management: Research, Leadership, Transformation / [ed] Leal Filho W., Luetz J., Ayal D., Cham: Springer, 2021, s. 1-16Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change will have a largely detrimental impact on the agricultural sector. Reduced yields will lead to greater food insecurity and a rise in food prices. In response, researchers have developed agricultural technologies and practices, commonly known as climate-smart agriculture (CSA). Scaling or large-scale farmer uptake of CSA is often seen as the responsibility of development practitioners. This, however, encourages a false dichotomy between knowledge generation through “research” and practice-based “scaling.” Such binary thinking poses two dangers. Firstly, when faced with donors’ understandable wish to see impact on the ground, agricultural research organizations succumb to “mission drift” and engage in “development work,” for which they have little comparative advantage. Secondly, because scaling is seen as a “development” as opposed to “research” issue, the contribution that research can make to understanding effective scaling is overlooked. We propose that agricultural research-for-development (AR4D) can contribute more to scaling by conceptualizing the process as a multifaceted one that catalyzes three interconnected and complimentary pathways: technology development, capacity development, and policy influence, each overseen by interdisciplinary research teams. We use our experience from rice-based systems in South and Southeast Asia to illustrate how a combination of all three pathways is required to enhance scaling of CSA.

  • 14.
    Hellin, Jon
    et al.
    Sustainable Impact Platform, International Rice Resaerch Institute (IRRI), Los Baños, Philippines.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Loboguerrero, Ana Maria
    CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Palmira, Colombia; Bioversity International, Rome, Italy.
    Reflections on Enhancing the Impact of Climate Risk Management Through Transformative Adaptation2021Inngår i: Frontiers in Climate, E-ISSN 2624-9553, Vol. 3, artikkel-id 751691Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate risk management is part of the response to the threat of climate change. Much effort has focused on the promotion on climate-resilient agriculture. There continues to be undue focus on technology solutions per se and not enough attention on the coupling of technologies and socio-economics and how they become embedded in ecological systems underpinning smallholder agriculture. In this perspective, we argue that an intertwined social–ecological–technological systems approach to climate risk management is needed to ensure that climate-resilient agriculture contributes more to the realization of goals of the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Furthermore, in line with broader policy thinking on the need for transformative change toward sustainably living on the planet and “leaving no one behind,” a greater focus on transformative adaptation is required. Transformative adaptation tackles the root causes of vulnerability including unevenly distributed power relations, and extant networks of control and influence. There are, however, relatively few examples of moving from the theory of transformative adaptation to practice. Three recent practical examples of transdisciplinary approaches, that we have direct experience of as researchers, provide lessons for initial ways forward as part of climate risk management initiatives. Examples from Vietnam, East and Southern Africa, and Guatemala illustrate the importance of inter- and transdisciplinary responses whereby the inequalities underlying unequal power structures may be addressed, enabling farmers to pursue climate risk management pathways that contribute to climate resilience and human development, as epitomized by the Sustainable Development Goals.

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  • 15. Hellin, Jon
    et al.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Ng'endo, Mary
    Loboguerrero, Ana Maria
    Ohenjo, Nyang'ori
    Rose, Sabrina
    Enhancing Indigenous Peoples' Participation in Climate Policy Processes2024Inngår i: PLOS Climate, Vol. 3, nr 4, s. 1-4Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Emphasises the importance of a granular approach to climate justice and indigenous peoples' participation in climate policy processes. A more explicit focus on context specific understanding of social equity allows for greater participation of the most vulnerable within Indigenous communities. This necessitates attention to historical and contemporary relations of power and oppression, ones that frame the lives of indigenous peoples' worldwide. By implication, it mitigates the dangers of maladaptation within these communities and gives greater credence to the pledge to leave no one behind. The importance of social equity highlights a key research develoipment and evidence gap ahead of the 2024 Conference of the Parties (COP) of the UNFCCC (COP29).

  • 16.
    Hellin, Jon
    et al.
    International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Los Baños, Philippines.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Taylor, Marcus
    Global Development Studies, Queen’s University, Kingston in Ontario, Canada.
    Bhasme, Suhas
    Centre for Water Policy, Regulation and Governance, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India.
    Loboguerrero, Ana María
    Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Rome, Italy.
    Transformative adaptation: from climate-smart to climate-resilient agriculture2023Inngår i: CABI Agriculture and Bioscience, ISSN 2662-4044, Vol. 4, nr 30Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to the climate crisis, there has been much focus on climate-smart agriculture (CSA); namely, technologies and practices that enhance adaptation, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and contribute to food security; the so-called triple win. Success has tended to be measured in terms of the number of farmers adopting CSA with less focus given to the impacts especially on human development. CSA can inadvertently lead to‘maladaptation’ whereby interventions reinforce existing vulnerabilities either by beneftting powerful elites or by transferring risks and exposure between groups. Such maladaptive outcomes often stem from overly technical adaptation programming that is driven by external objectives and discounts the social and political dynamics of vulnerability. Increasingly a more nuanced picture is emerging. This reveals how a failure to contextualize CSA in relation to the structural socioeconomic dynamics associated with agricultural systems that render some categories of farmer especially vulnerable to climate change, undermines CSA’s contribution to reducing rural poverty and increasing equity. In response, there is a growing focus on transformative orientations that pursue a more deep-seated approach to social, institutional, technological and cultural change in order to address the structural contributors to vulnerability and diferential exposure to climate risk. Addressing these questions requires a robust consideration of the social contexts and power relations through which agriculture is both researched and practiced. For agriculture to be transformative and contribute to broader development goals, a greater emphasis is needed on issues of farmer heterogeneity, the dangers of maladaptation and the importance of social equity. This entails recognizing that resilience encompasses both agroand socio-ecological dimensions. Furthermore, practitioners need to be more cognizant of the dangers of (i) benefting groups of already better of farmers at the expense of the most vulnerable and/or (ii) focusing on farmers for whom agriculture is not a pathway out of poverty. The success of these approaches rests on genuine transdisciplinary partnerships and systems approaches that ensure adaptation and mitigation goals along with more equitable incomes, food security and development. The greater emphasis on social equity and human well-being distinguishes climate-resilient from climate-smart agriculture.

  • 17.
    Martin, Maria A.
    et al.
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Sendra, Olga Alcaraz
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Bastos, Ana
    Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena, Germany.
    Bauer, Nico
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Bertram, Christoph
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bowen, Kathryn
    Melbourne Climate Futures, Melbourne Law School, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
    Brando, Paulo M.
    University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Rudolph, Tanya Brodie
    South Africa Centre for Sustainability Transitions (CST), University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
    Büchs, Milena
    University of Leeds, School of Earth and Environment, Leeds, UK.
    Bustamante, Mercedes
    University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil.
    Chen, Deliang
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cleugh, Helen
    WCRP Joint Scientific Committee (JSC), Canberra, Australia.
    Dasgupta, Purnamita
    International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Denton, Fatima
    United Nations University, Institute for Natural Resources in Africa, Accra, Ghana.
    Donges, Jonathan F.
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Donkor, Felix Kwabena
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography, University of Education-Winneba, Winneba, Ghana.
    Duan, Hongbo
    School of Economics and Management, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Duarte, Carlos M.
    Red Sea Research Center (RSRC), and Computational Biosciences Research Center (CBRC), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Ebi, Kristie L.
    Center for Health and the Global Environment (CHanGE), University of Washington, Washington, USA.
    Edwards, Clea M.
    Global Futures Laboratory, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Engel, Anja
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Fuss, Sabine
    Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC), Berlin, Germany; Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Gaertner, Juliana
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Gettelman, Andrew
    National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO, USA.
    Girardin, Cécile A.J.
    University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Golledge, Nicholas R.
    Antarctic Research Centre, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.
    Green, Jessica F.
    University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Grose, Michael R.
    CSIRO, Canberra, Australia.
    Hashizume, Masahiro
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Hebden, Sophie
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hepach, Helmke
    Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, Hamburg, Germany.
    Hirota, Marina
    Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil.
    Hsu, Huang-Hsiung
    Anthropogenic Climate Change Center, Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Kojima, Satoshi
    Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Miuragun, Hayama, Japan.
    Lele, Sharachchandra
    Centre for Environment & Development, ATREE, Bengaluru, India.
    Lorek, Sylvia
    Sustainable Europe Research Institute, Cologne, Germany; ZOE Institute for Future-Fit economies, Cologne, Germany.
    Lotze, Heike K.
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Matthews, H. Damon
    Concordia University, Montreal, Canada.
    McCauley, Darren
    Erasmus University of Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Mebratu, Desta
    South Africa Centre for Sustainability Transitions (CST), University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa; Addis Ababa University Institute of Technology, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Mengis, Nadine
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Nolan, Rachael H.
    Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia; NSW Bushfire Risk Management Research Hub, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.
    Pihl, Erik
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rahmstorf, Stefan
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Redman, Aaron
    Global Futures Laboratory, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Reid, Colleen E.
    University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA.
    Rockström, Johan
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany; University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Rogelj, Joeri
    Imperial College London, London, UK; International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Saunois, Marielle
    Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, LSCEIPSL (CEA-CNRS-UVSQ), Université Paris-Saclay, Gif sur Yvette, France.
    Sayer, Lizzie
    International Science Council, Paris, France.
    Schlosser, Peter
    Global Futures Laboratory, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
    Sioen, Giles B.
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Tokyo, Japan; National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Spangenberg, Joachim H.
    Sustainable Europe Research Institute, Cologne, Germany.
    Stammer, Detlef
    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Sterner, Thomas N.S.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stevens, Nicola
    University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Thonicke, Kirsten
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Tian, Hanqin
    International Center for Climate and Global Change Research, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.
    Winkelmann, Ricarda
    Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Member of the Leibniz Association, Potsdam, Germany; University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Woodcock, James
    MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Ten new insights in climate science 2021: a horizon scan2021Inngår i: Global Sustainability, E-ISSN 2059-4798, Vol. 4, artikkel-id e25Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-technical summary

    We summarize some of the past year's most important findings within climate change-related research. New research has improved our understanding about the remaining options to achieve the Paris Agreement goals, through overcoming political barriers to carbon pricing, taking into account non-CO2 factors, a well-designed implementation of demand-side and nature-based solutions, resilience building of ecosystems and the recognition that climate change mitigation costs can be justified by benefits to the health of humans and nature alone. We consider new insights about what to expect if we fail to include a new dimension of fire extremes and the prospect of cascading climate tipping elements.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Nyakato, Viola Nilah
    et al.
    Faculty of Interdisciplinary Studies, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda.
    Kemigisha, Elizabeth
    Faculty of Interdisciplinary Studies, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda.
    Tuhumwire, Margaret
    Environmental Women for Action in Development (EWAD).
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Covid reveals flaws in the protection of girls in Uganda: recommendations on how to tackle sexual and gender-based violence2021Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Rates of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) are high in Uganda, by both global and African comparison, and the Covid-19 pandemic has made things even worse. Breaking the cultural, religious and social norms that perpetuate and trivialise SGBV is key to improve the situation. However, there are also other measures, such as communication channels for reporting and following up on SGBV, safe shelters and support for girls threatened by perpetrators, and improved sexual education in schools.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 19.
    Pihl, Erik
    et al.
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Sweden.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Zelinka, Mark D.
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA.
    Ten New Insights in Climate Science 2020: a Horizon Scan2021Inngår i: Global Sustainability, E-ISSN 2059-4798, Vol. 4Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-technical summary: We summarize some of the past year’s most important findings within climate change-related research. New research has improved our understanding of Earth’s sensitivity to carbon dioxide, finds that permafrost thaw could release more carbon emissions than expected and that the uptake of carbon in tropical ecosystems is weakening. Adverse impacts on human society include increasing water shortages and impacts on mental health. Options for solutions emerge from rethinking economic models, rights-based litigation, strengthened governance systems and a new social contract. The disruption caused by COVID-19 could be seized as an opportunity for positive change, directing economic stimulus towards sustainable investments.

  • 20.
    Pijpers, Robert
    et al.
    University of Hamburg, Germany.
    Calvimontes, Jorge
    University of Campinas, Brazil.
    Camp, Esther van de
    Leiden University, The Netherlands.
    D'Angelo, Lorenzo
    University of Hamburg, Germany.
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. University of Reading.
    Lanzano, Cristiano
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Massaro, Luciana
    University of Campinas, Brazil.
    Mining ‘Waste’: Repurposing Residues in Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining2021Inngår i: Etnofoor, ISSN 0921-5158, Vol. 33, nr 2, s. 13-39Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Gold mining, like all other forms of mining, is strongly associated with the production of a wide range of residues, whether this concerns (toxic) waste materials or the environments transformed in pursuit of gold. Frequently, these residual products, such as soil, mud, rocks, and water, as well as the environments from which they are extracted or where they are deposited, appear as waste, cast aside or abandoned, rendered as useless by-products or destroyed lands. In this photographic essay, we build on recent insight regarding the fluid character of waste by extending analysis into both the domains of materials and of space because not only can specific materials be repurposed as resources, but also specific spaces can be transformed from sites of abandonment to sites of production (or vice versa), whether for mining or other activities. These photographic series show how different actors repurpose material and spatial residues. By centralising images of processes of repurposing, this essay nuances and offers a counterweight to dominant visual narratives. These typically focus on environmental and social damage, and often take a perspective ‘from above’ as they largely draw on aerial images. In doing so, these narratives tend to flatten or even erase local complexity and heterogeneity, and risk reproducing received negative stereotypes about artisanal and small-scale mining and miners. Importantly, as will transpire throughout the essay, the phenomena and processes depicted in our images shape and are shaped by different social, political, economic, technological, environmental, and historical relations and dynamics. These include, for example, former mining trajectories, gendered production relations, miners’ socio-economic positions, the involvement of external actors, and the introduction of new capital, knowledge and technologies. Ultimately, this illuminates the necessity of approaching ‘waste’ in fluid, relational, and transformative terms as material and spatial endings are turned into new beginnings.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21. Rietveld, Anne M.
    et al.
    Gartaula, Hom
    Farnworth, Cathy Rozel
    López, Diana E.
    Bailey, Arwen
    Hellin, Jonathan
    Kramer, Berber
    Teeken, Béla
    Mujawamariya, Gaudiose
    Choudhury, Afrina
    A Community of Practice for Gender-Transformative Research Methodologies2022Rapport (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Community of Practice on Gender-Transformative Research Methodologies (GTRM-CoP) builds on work conducted by international gender researchers at CGIAR and partner organizations. The community of practice is committed to gender-transformative change processes; and aims to co-create socially just and gender-equitable futures in food, land and water systems. The GTRM-CoP aims to promote the transformative ambitions of CGIAR, its partners, and interested organizations and individuals, by creating safe spaces for innovating, sharing and scaling gender-transformative research methodologies. The community of practice is part of the CGIAR GENDER Impact Platform and housed under the Methods module of the Platform. A Community of Practice (CoP) is an ideal mechanism for promoting rapid, interactive and creative learning. Four initial topic groups have been identified to begin knowledge exchange and co-creation: gender-equitable masculinities, intersectionality, transformative research processes and data, and mobilizing GENNOVATE data and tools. The GTRM-CoP aims to accelerate learning and action that fosters gender-transformative change in food, land and water systems, through the interactions within and between the topic groups, following a set of principles and values and in a spirit of humility and learning. These lessons will be available to others within CGIAR and beyond as part of a global movement toward gender equity and achieving Gender Equality (SDG 5) and Reduced Inequalities (SDG 10).

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Twongyirwe, Ronald
    et al.
    Department of Environment and Livelihoods Support Systems, Faculty of Interdisciplinary Studies, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Mbarara, Uganda; School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom .
    Fisher, Eleanor
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Karungi, Christine
    Graduate student, Faculty of Interdisciplinary Studies, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Mbarara, Uganda.
    Ndugu, Nelson
    Department of Physics, North-West University, Mmabatho, South Africa; Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Muni University, Arua, Uganda.
    Projected land use change in an oil-rich landscape in Uganda: A participatory modelling approach2022Inngår i: The Extractive Industries and Society, ISSN 2214-790X, E-ISSN 2214-7918, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 101071Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery of oil in the North Albertine Rift Landscape of Uganda has increased pressure on land andheightened the potential for resource use conflict. In this article, we focus on changing land use dynamics as oilextraction unfolds in a new resource frontier. We ask how the development of the nascent oil industry will affectland use dynamics, including land use conflicts. This leads us to identify the land use change already arising andto use this as the basis for participatory modelling of projected change. Given they are dominant forms of landuse, agriculture and forestry are central to our analysis. Design of the methodology combined remote sensingwith innovative modelling incorporating participatory development methods. This facilitated insight into projected land use patterns, and specifically relationships between small-scale food production, commercial sugarcane production, and forestry conservation adjacent to settlement areas. Our data show that ill–defined landboundaries and an aggressive sugarcane out-grower scheme are avenues for so-called land grabbing. Modellingscenarios under both the status quo and under oil extraction suggest the land area covered by sugarcane production will increase at the expense of food crop farming. Given a context where forestry conservation is animportant form of land use, we also consider the implications of local agricultural change on land reserved forconservation. Overall, our modelling indicates that in accounting for land use change within the resource frontierassociated with oil extraction, there needs to be insight into the intricate interconnections between differentforms of rural land use as future change unfolds. Understanding how oil extraction effects rural land use patternsholds relevance for planning in contexts of the Global South where new oil industries are emerging. Innovativemethodologies for teasing out these complex land use dynamics can aid planning that seeks to anticipate andreduce land use conflict and support agricultural livelihoods. 

  • 23.
    Pihl, Erik ()
    Future Earth Global Secretariat, Sweden.
    Fisher, Eleanor ()
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Zelinka, Mark D. ()
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA.
    10 New Insights in Climate Science 20202021Rapport (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 24. Luning, Sabine ()
    van Zijl, Rose ()
    Hofsteenge, Niels
    Fisher, Eleanor ()
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Lanzano, Cristiano
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit.
    Exhibition Gold Matters2021Annet (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Exploring Transformations to Sustainability in Artisanal and Small-scale Gold Mining (ASGM)’ is a 4-year transdisciplinary research project (2018-2022) that examines whether and how societal transformations towards sustainable mining futures are possible in ASGM. It brings together a multi-national team conducting empirical research in Brazil, Suriname, French Guiana, Ghana, Burkina Faso, Guinea Conakry, and Uganda. The core team includes researchers from different disciplines, artists, and a community development practitioner. Closely linked are miners and community members who work with the Team.

    Project activities include research with miners to understand how they see the future and sustainability in gold mining. This has involved photography, painting and sculpture to find ways to express people’s lives and futures in mining. 

    The Exhibition takes the audience down on a journey moving from ‘Exhibition of the Exhibition in Kejetia’ to visual results from all the three regions organized around the themes: Co-labouring, ARTistic and ARTisanal, In-depth terrains, Gold Lifeways and Moving Matters.

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