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  • 1.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics & Rural Development, Arish University, Al-Arish, Egypt.
    Ravula, Padmaja
    Nedumaran, Swamikannu
    Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan
    Perceptions of the impacts of urban sprawl among urban and peri-urban dwellers of Hyderabad, India: a Latent class clustering analysis2022Ingår i: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975, Vol. 24, nr 11, s. 12787-12812Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many other developing countries, urban sprawl is a growing phenomenon in India, which poses socio-economic and environmental challenges that worryingly affect urban sustainability. In this study, a latent class clustering approach was used to investigate perceptions of urban sprawl among 622 urban and peri-urban dwellers in Hyderabad. The empirical results clustered the respondents into three distinct classes based on their perceptions of urban sprawl impacts: ‘undecided respondents’, ‘negative perceivers’, and ‘opportunity perceivers’. The majority of respondents were undecided with no strong views towards the impacts of urban sprawl, which may increase their vulnerability and hinder effective adaptation to the adverse economic, social and environmental effects of urban sprawl. This also provokes concerns about the effectiveness of government interventions to build public awareness of urban development and its impacts on the city. With regard to the role of demographic and socio-economic characteristics in shaping the perception of the respondents, the results revealed that social caste plays a determining role in forming dwellers’ perception. In particular, members of marginalised social castes were more likely to form positive perceptions of the impacts of urban sprawl as urban expansion generates better and stable income that improve their social status. In addition, individuals with higher levels of education were more likely to form negative or positive perceptions, implying that efforts to raise social capital could be a useful means for mitigating the impacts of urban sprawl. Finally, membership in community development organisations was a key factor in dictating membership of the negative perceivers’ class. Overall, our findings suggest that an appropriate policy framework and specific programmes are needed for enhancing dwellers’ perception towards the impacts of urban sprawl, which can enhance the design, acceptance, and implementation of a more sustainable governance of urbanisation and contribute to achieving urban sustainability in developing countries.

  • 2.
    Bassler,, Arnd
    et al.
    BLE, Germany.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zebeli, Quendrim
    University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.
    Deliverable of Work Package 7: Common Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda2022Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 3.
    Bwalya Umar, Bridget
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
    Adapting to Climate Change Through Conservation Agriculture: A Gendered Analysis of Eastern Zambia2021Ingår i: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 5, artikel-id 748300Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the use of conservation agriculture (CA) as a climate adaptationstrategy among smallholder farmers in Eastern Zambia. Using 761 household interviewsand 33 focus group discussions (FGDs) with smallholder farmers from six districts, datawas collected on how smallholder farmers in the region experience climate change,what CA practices they had adopted, and benefits and challenges associated withCA practice. Results show that men and women farmers had similar experiences ofclimate change, namely late onset of a shortened rainy season, intra-seasonal droughtand higher temperatures. Farmers’ perceptions of gender-mediated effects of climatechange had important nuances. The three most cited effects of climate change onwomen mentioned by women were lower crop yields, outbreaks of armyworms andreduced livestock fodder. The men thought women were most affected by increasedhunger, lower crop yields and reduced domestic water sources. According to the womenFGDs, men were most affected through reduced crop yields, increases in livestockdiseases and increased hunger. The men self-reported reduced crop yields, reducedwater for livestock and outbreaks of armyworms. Both men and women saw CA ashaving climate change adaptation benefits. For the women, men most benefitted fromCA through the high moisture holding capacity of basins, higher crop yields and reducedlabor requirements through use of oxen ripping. The men most appreciated the highcrop yields, improved soil fertility and reduced costs as less fertilizer is used. The womencited the high moisture holding capacity of basins, high crop yields and improved soilfertility as benefits they most commonly derived from CA, while the men thought thewomen most benefitted from CA through the higher crop yields, improved soil fertilityand crop tolerance to droughts. The study concludes that there is room for CA to serveas a climate smart agricultural system for both men and women smallholder farmers inEastern Zambia. However, this will require addressing important challenges of high weedpressure, high labor demands, and low access to manure, and CA farming implements.The CA package for Zambia should include access to timely climate information andclimate informed crop choices

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  • 4.
    Fang, Wang
    et al.
    Institute of Agricultural Economics and Information, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
    Yang, Zhenyu
    Institute of Agricultural Economics and Information, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
    Liu, Zhen
    School of Business, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics and Rural Development, Arish University, Arish, Egypt.
    Green recovery of cropland carrying capacity in developed regions: empirical evidence from Guangdong, China2023Ingår i: Economic Change and Restructuring, ISSN 1573-9414, E-ISSN 1574-0277, Vol. 56, nr 3, s. 2405-2436Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper evaluates the carrying capacity of cultivated land in Guangdong Province,China, using the entropy weight method. Ecological and environmental pressuresignificantly impacts capacity, while economic and social factors are stable.Production pressure fluctuates and rises. To improve capacity, we must reduce ecologicaland environmental pressure, protect cultivated land resources, develop andpromote green technology, and maintain water conservation facilities. The resultsindicate that reducing ecological and environmental pressure is essential to improvethe carrying capacity of cultivated land in Guangdong Province. In conclusion, thisstudy highlights the importance of balancing economic growth with environmentalsustainability in developing regions like Guangdong Province. It suggests that aholistic approach that considers ecological, economic, and social factors is necessaryto ensure long-term food security and sustainable land use practices.

  • 5.
    Huang, Wei
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Liu, Qian
    Department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Department of Economics and Rural Development, Arish University, Arish, Egypt.
    Is the technical efficiency green?: The environmental efficiency of agricultural production in the MENA region2023Ingår i: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 327, artikel-id 116820Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 6. Nabuurs, G-J
    et al.
    Mrabet, R.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Research Unit. Department of Economics, The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Bustamante, M.
    Clark, H.
    Havlik, P.
    House, J.
    Mbow, C.
    Ninan, K. N.
    Popp, A.
    Roe, S.
    Sohngen, B.
    Towprayoon, S.
    Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses (AFOLU)2022Ingår i: Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change / [ed] P.R. Shukla, J. Skea, R. Slade, A. Al Khourdajie, R. van Diemen, D. McCollum, M. Pathak, S. Some, P. Vyas, R. Fradera, M. Belkacemi, A. Hasija, G. Lisboa, S. Luz, J. Malley, Cambridge, UK; New York, NY, US: Cambridge University Press, 2022, s. 747-860Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 7. Ran, Ylva
    et al.
    Van Rysselberge, Pierre
    Macura, Biljana
    Persson, U. Martin
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet.
    Jonell, Malin
    Lindahl, Therese
    Röös, Elin
    Effects of public policy interventions for environmentally sustainable food consumption: a systematic map of available evidence2024Ingår i: Environmental Evidence, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikel-id 10Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 8.
    Robling, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hatab, Assem Abu
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Säll, Sarah
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hansson, Helena
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Measuring sustainability at farm level: A critical view on data and indicators2023Ingår i: Environmental and Sustainability Indicators, E-ISSN 2665-9727, Vol. 18, artikel-id 100258Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring sustainability at farm level is a priority for both research and policy and requires sustainability indicators to track progress. Indicators make the sustainability concept more concrete and guide farm level decisions, playing a decisive role in determining food system impacts on societies and the environment. Data availability is often a limiting factor when choosing indicators, but not enough attention is paid to the role of data in indicator construction and assessment results. This paper assessed the critical role of data in indicator construction and the potential limitations that current data availability imposes on farm-level sustainability assessments, using the example of dairy farms in Sweden. To do so we used a five-step approach consisting of a literature review, an inventory of data sources, an expert consultation, a matching and gap analysis, and a critical assessment. We found that 20 indicators categorized under 12 out of 20 sustainability themes had measurement issues due to missing scope, temporary data, or additional data requirements. At least some indicators were measurable within all themes in the social and economic dimensions while all indicators for pesticides, non-renewable energy, and soil quality in the environmental dimension had measurement issues. In the critical assessment, we argue that for some indicators, there are trade-offs between data availability and issues of comprehensibility and analytical validity. Furthermore, we found that no single data source could be used to measure all themes; which means that merging of different data sets is needed for a broader on-farm sustainability assessment. Our findings are relevant for the discussion on sustainability indicators and will inform future programs aimed at collecting sustainability data at farm level, which should consider the broad data needs identified and the potential to merge data to enable holistic sustainability assessments.

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