Change search
Refine search result
123 51 - 100 of 118
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Norström Ridæus, Barbro
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    100 vägar till Afrika: en introduktion till modern afrikansk skönlitteratur2003 (ed. 2 uppl.)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Skönlitteratur är en utmärkt förmedlare av kunskap om ett land, dess folk, kultur, tankesätt m m. I denna bok beskrivs utförligt över etthundra olika verk av afrikanska författare som finns översatta till svenska. Boken innehåller även biografier över författarna, en förteckning över artiklar om afrikanska författare och deras verk, samt en annoterad förteckning över internationella tidskrifter med kulturellt och litterärt innehåll.

  • 52.
    Nwadike, Cletus Nelson
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Berg, Bengt
    Nigeria – Småland, a round trip2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Cletus Nelson Nwadike presents his new poem/photo book 'Tankar ur ett lejons gap' in a conversation with publisher Bengt Berg.

  • 53.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Changing rituals and reinventing tradition: The burnt Viking ship at Myklebostad, Western Norway2015In: Changing rituals and ritual changes: Function and Meaning in Ancient Funerary Practices / [ed] Brandt, J. R., Ingvaldsen, H. & Prusac, M., Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2015, p. 359-377Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Cosmogony2011In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Ritual and Religion: Timothy Insoll, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, p. 76-88Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmogony as a term is derived from the two Greek words kosmos and genesis. Kosmos refers to the order of the universe and/or the universe as the order, whereas genesis refers to the process of coming into being (Long 1993: 94). Thus, cosmogony has to do with founding myths and the origin and the creation of the gods and cosmos and how the world came into existence. There are schematically several different types of cosmogenic myths classified according to their symbolic structure: (1) creation from nothing, (2) creation from chaos, (3) creation from a cosmic egg, (4) creation from world parents, (5) creation through a process of emergence, and (6) creation through the agency of an earth diver. Several of these motifs and typological forms may be present in a given cosmogenic myth-system, and these types are not mutually exclusive but may rather be used in parallel in creation ororigin myths (Long 1993: 94). There are cosmogenic myths in all religions. In the Hebrew myth, there is creation from nothing: ‘And God said. “Let there be light”; and there was light’ (Gen. 1: 3). Importantly, in transcendental religions such as Judaism, Christianity, and Islam the omnipotent god exists totally independent of its own creation (Trigger 2003: 473), but still there are cosmogenic myths. Usually, however, cosmogony refers to a divine structuring principle where cosmos and the world are not independent of its original creation, but dependent upon the outcome of the ritual relation between humans and deities for its future existence, and such religions are traditionally called cosmogenic, putting the emphasis on human rituals. Thus, there are differences between cosmogenic and transcendental religions with regards to structures of beliefs and practices. A cosmogenic religion links humans’ rituals in the present with the divine glory in the past and cosmic stability and prosperity in the future. Hence, a cosmogenic religion enables and prescribes particular types of ritualpractices which are archaeologically manifest in the material culture, and all the early civilizations have been cosmogenic (Trigger 2003: 444–5) together with the majority of prehistoric religions. Although cosmogony had been an analytical term before Mircea Eliade developed these perspectives, his writings in the 1950s (e.g. Eliade 1954, 1959a [1987]) have strongly influenced researchers’ views of peoples’ beliefs of the world and universe in early civilizations (Trigger 2003: 445). Cosmogony as a religious framework for understanding the world and the universe necessitates specific types of interactions and rituals with the divinities. Hence, due to the strong influence of Eliade’s work on cosmogony as a principleand process, this article will focus on (1) his premises and analyses, (2) criticism and development of cosmogony as a concept, and (3) how it is possible to analyse cosmogenic rituals and religious practices as manifest in the archaeological record. This will include:(a) rituals, with particular emphasis on death and sacrifices in the Aztec civilization; and(b) monuments, with particular emphasis on the pyramids in the ancient Egyptian civilization, since these are processes and places where the dual interaction between humans and divinities took place, which recreated cosmos against the threat of chaos. Together, these case studies will illuminate the possibilities of a cosmogenic perspective in the archaeology of ritual and religion despite the difficulties with Eliade’s structural universalism.

  • 55.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Cremating Corpses: Destroying, defying or Deifying Death?2015In: Ancient Death Ways : Proceedings of the workshop on archaeology and mortuary practices. Uppsala, 16-17 May 2013 / [ed] Hackwitz, K. v. & Peyroteo-Stjerna, R., Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2015, p. 65-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cremation as a funeral practice is unique in the sense that throughfire as a medium the dead are actively incorporated into otherspheres and realms. The problem of decaying corpses has beensolved through history in one way or another, irrespective of culture.Although Christianity has seen cremation as destructive andnegative, obliterating death and destroying the corpse, consequentlyhindering resurrection, in other cultures and time periodsthe cremation fire has been a positive and transformative medium.It is through transformation that the deceased is revitalised andgains new life in another existence, and it may even enable divineexistences. Thus, with different comparative cremation practicesin the past and the present, this paper discusses concepts of death.

  • 56.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Cremations in culture and cosmology2013In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial / [ed] Tarlow, S & Nilsson, L. S, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 497-509Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Dammed divinities: the water powers at Bujagali Falls, Uganda2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The damming of Bujagali Falls, located only 8 kilometers north of the historic source of the White Nile or the outlet of Lake Victoria, has been seen as one of the most controversial dams in modern times. In 2012, the dam was eventually inaugurated after years of anti-dam opposition and delays. A unique aspect of the controversies was the river spirit Budhagaali living in the falls blocking the dam and opposing the destruction of the waterfalls. This spirits embodies a particular healer – Jaja Bujagali, but he was bypassed by another healer who conducted no less than three grandiose appeasement and relocation ceremonies for the Budhagaali spirit clearing the way for the dam. Why has this particular dam been so controversial? How can a water spirit block a nearly billion dollar dam? What was the ritual drama behind the construction of the dam and is it possible to move a spirit? And what happened to Budhagaali and the indigenous religion after the falls were flooded and can a river spirit be drowned in its own element – water?

  • 58.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Developing the ‘Other’: Challenging Concepts2016In: Framing African Development: Challenging Concepts / [ed] Havnevik, K., Oestigaard, T., Tobisson, E. & Virtanen, T., Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 16-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Holy water: the universal and the particular : discussion2014In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 162-165Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Holy water: the works of water indefining and understanding holiness2017In: WIREs Water, ISSN 0935-879X, E-ISSN 2049-1948, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Holy water has a central role in shaping the understanding and beliefs of holiness in general, but how does holy water work, and what defines holy water? By analyzing holy water in three different religious traditions—Christianity in Northern Europe, Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity, and Hinduism—the aim is to discuss the metaphysical essence of water in human understanding and ideas of holiness embodied in water. On the one hand, holy water represents purity and has to be protected from defilement, but on the other hand, many holy rivers are severely polluted. This seeming paradox will be analyzed by focusing on actual beliefs and uses of holy water in ritual and religious practices. Holy water transmits purity and holiness, but it also transfers, transports, and transforms impurities. In the process of obtaining spiritual purity, devotees may pollute the holy because holy water is believed to have a divine agency. By comparing ritual practices and beliefs in three distinct religious traditions in Europe, Africa, and Asia, it is possible to enhance the understanding of the ways holiness and holy water are perceived to work in cultural-specific religious worldviews based on essential capacities of water cross-culturally. This directs the attention to the structuring mechanisms at work because water is conceptualized and used as holy in remarkably similar ways in many religions.

  • 61.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Horus' Eye and Osiris' Efflux:: The Egyptian Civilisation of Inundation c. 3000-2000 BCE.2011In: Ostrakon. Norsk egyptologisk selskaps bulletin., Vol. 3, p. 23-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 62.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Horus' Eye and Osiris' Efflux: The Egyptian Civilisation of Inundation ca. 3000-2000 BCE.2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Death and the life-giving waters of the Nile were intimately interwoven in ancient Egyptian religion. The principal objective of this study is to develop a synthetic perspective for enhancing the understanding of the religious roles water had in the rise and constitution of the Egyptian civilisation during the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom. The author employs an archaeological, inter-disciplinary and comparative ‘water perspective’ in which water not only forms the analytical framework, but also provides empirical data that allow for new questions to be addressed. Thus, the Nile itself is used as the primary point of departure to analyse how, why and when religious changes took place, with a particular emphasis on the development of the Osiris cult. Use is made of contemporary written sources, in particular the Pyramid Texts, but also other mortuary texts as well as flood records. The evolution of the Osiris cult is then analysed in relation to the development of the mortuary monuments; the mastabas in the First and the Second Dynasties and the emergence of the pyramids from the Third Dynasty. Hence, by comparing the different funerary monuments and practices with the emergence of the Osiris cult in relation to climatic changes and fluctuations in the Nile’s yearly inundation, Ancient Egyptian religion and the rise of the civilisation is analyzed according to a water perspective. It is noted that the Blue Nile was not blue, but red-brownish during the flood. When the flood started, the White Nile was not white, but green. The author argues that these fundamental characteristics of the Nile water formed the basis for the Osiris mythology. The red floodwaters in particular represented the blood of the slain Osiris.

  • 63.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Ian Kuijt, Colin P. Quinn, and Gabriel Cooney: Transformation by Fire: The Archaeology of Cremation in Cultural Context. The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 2014. 322 pp. ISBN 978-0-8165-3114-12015In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 53-55Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Jason O’Donoughue. Water from stone: archaeology and conservation at Florida’s springs. 2017. Gainesville: University Press of Florida; 978-1-68340009-7 $74.952018In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 92, no 362, p. 549-551Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Prehistoric Ethics: Comment to Liv Nilsson Stutz’ article2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 65-70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Rainbows, pythons and waterfalls: heritage, poverty and sacrifice among the Busoga, Uganda2019Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural and natural heritage is a fundamental part of society and crucial in any development process; yet because of the complexity, it has proved difficult to incorporate culture and tradition in actual policy practice. Here the rich heritage of the Busoga is explored, using the water cosmology at the Itanda Falls in Uganda, with a specific emphasis on a rainmaking ritual and sacrifice to the rain-god during a drought. While rainmaking rituals cannot mitigate climate change in the modern world, and while fewer and fewer people believe in the traditional religion, the past and its traditions are still sources for the future. As we rethink the role of heritage in the processes of poverty alleviation, it is argued, a strong emphasis on cultural and natural heritage is one of the most efficient and important areas of long-term development in an era of globalization, when traditions are disappearing. Without a past, there is no future.

  • 67.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Rainfed agriculture, drought and hunger in Tanzania2016In: A History of Water, Series 3, Volume 3. Water and Food: From Hunter-Gatherers to Global Production in Africa / [ed] Terje Tvedt & Terje Oestigaard, London: I.B. Tauris, 2016, p. 332-354Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Religion at work in globalised traditions: rainmaking, witchcraft and christianity in Tanzania2014Book (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Sol och vattenkult i den egyptiska civilisationen2012In: Forskning och framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, no 1, p. 28-29Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Sol- og vannkult i Egypt2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 71.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    The Nature of Archaeology: Beyond the Linguistic Turn: (Comments on discussion article by Brit Solli)2011In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 30-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    The Source of the Blue Nile: Water Rituals and Traditions in the Lake Tana Region2013Book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    The Sources of the Nile and Paradoxes of Religious Waters2018In: Open Rivers : Rethinking Water, Place & Community, ISSN 2471- 190X, no 11, p. 66-85Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Water2011In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Ritual and Religion / [ed] Timothy Insoll, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, p. 38-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water in the archaeology of ritual and religion includes water as a perspective and water as empirical data. The life-giving waters in society and religion are the fresh waters in their many facets in the hydrological cycle. Water is always in a flux. The fluid matter changes qualities and capacities wherever it is, and it always takes new forms. This transformative character of water is forcefully used in ritual practices and religious constructions. Water represents the one and the many at the same time, and the plurality of ritual institutionalizations and religious perceptions puts emphasis on water’s structuring principles and processes in culture and the cosmos. Water is fundamental in many ritual practices and to conceptions of the divinities and cosmos in prehistoric religions, and consequently the study of water in ritual and religion may reveal insights into both what religion is and how devotees perceive themselves, the divine spheres, and their own religious practices and rituals. The pervasive role of water-worlds in society and cosmos unites micro and macro cosmos, creates life, and legitimizes social hierarchies and religious practices and beliefs. Water is a medium which links or changes totally different aspects of humanity and divinities into a coherent unit; it bridges paradoxes, transcends the differenthuman and divine realms, allows interactions with gods, and enables the divinities to interfere with humanity. Water is a medium for everything—it has human character because we are humans; it is a social matter but also a spiritual substance and divine manifestation with immanent powers; and, still, it belongs to the realm of nature as a fluid liquid. The hydrological cycle links all places and spheres together, and water transcends the common categories by which we conceptualize the world and cosmos (Tvedt and Oestigaard 2006). The religious water-worlds, cosmologies, beliefs, and ritual practices are evident in the archaeological record, mythology, and written sources. Hence, it is necessaryto identify different types of water, the particular qualities associated with each of them,and how water materializes as religious and ritual structures, practices, and beliefs.

  • 75.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Water, national identities and hydro-politics in Egypt and Ethiopia2016In: Land and Hydro-politics in the Nile River Basin: Challenges and New Investments / [ed] Sandström, E., Jägerskog, A. & Oestigaard, T., London: Routledge, 2016, p. 211-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Witchcraft, witch killings and Christianity: The works of religion and parallel cosmologies in Tanzania2015In: Looking back, looking ahead: land, agriculture and society in East Africa: a festschrift for Kjell Havnevik / [ed] Michael Ståhl, Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, 2015, p. 182-199Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Abawa Firew, Gedef
    University of Bergen.
    Gish Abay – the source of the Blue Nile2011In: Water and Society / [ed] In Pepper, D. W. & Brebbia, C. A., Southampton. Boston: WIT Press, 2011, p. 27-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The river Nile is by many seen as the most important river in the world. The source of the Blue Nile is a spring called Gish Abay in Ethiopia. This is the source of Gilgal Abay (meaning the little Abay), which is the most voluminous of the some sixty rivers flowing into Lake Tana. Although the Nile Quest has attracted emperors and explorers alike since Antiquity, after the sources of the Nile were discovered the majority of studies have focused on hydrology and not on cultural and religious aspects of the river. Gish Abay has been seen as the outlet of the river Gihon flowing directly from Paradise linking this world with Heaven. The holiness of Abay and the source in particular have had and still have an important role in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. Moreover, before the source was Christianised it had a central role in the indigenous religion where lavish ox sacrifices were conducted. Thus, in this article we highlight the ritual and religious role of Gish Abay in a historic perspective.

  • 78.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Kaliff, Anders
    Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism : Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Death matters and the matters of death are initially, and to a large extent, the decaying flesh of the corpse. Cremation as a ritual practice is the fastest and most optimal way of dissolving the corpse’s flesh, either by annihilation or purification, or a combination. Still, cremation was not the final rite, and the archaeological record testifies that the dead represented a means to other ends – the flesh, and not the least the bones – have been incorporated in a wide range of other ritual contexts. While human sacrifices and cannibalism as ritual phenomena are much discussed in anthropology, archaeology has an advantage, since the actual bone material leaves traces of ritual practices that are unseen and unheard of in the contemporary world. As such, this book fleshes out a broader and more coherent understanding of prehistoric religions and funeral practices in Scandinavia by focusing on cremation, corpses and cannibalism.

  • 79.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Kaliff, Anders
    Kremation och kosmologi: en komparativ arkeologisk introduktion2013Book (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Sandström, EmilAnders, Jägerskog
    Land and Hydropolitics in the Nile River Basin: Challenges and New Investments2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nile River Basin supports the livelihoods of millions of people in Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan and Uganda, principally as water for agriculture and hydropower. The resource is the focus of much contested development, not only between upstream and downstream neighbours, but also from countries outside the region. This book investigates the water, land and energy nexus in the Nile Basin.

    It explains how the current surge in land and energy investments, both by foreign actors as well as domestic investors, affects already strained transboundary relations in the region and how investments are intertwined within wider contexts of Nile Basin history, politics and economy. Overall, the book presents a range of perspectives, drawing on political science, international relations theory, sociology, history and political ecology.

  • 81.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Tvedt, Terje
    A History of Water. Series 2, Vol. 1.: Ideas of Water : From Ancient Societies to the Modern World2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Tvedt, Terje
    A History of Water. Series 3, Vol. 1.: Water and Urbanization2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Tvedt, Terje
    A History of Water, Series 3, Vol. 3: Water and Food: From Hunter-Gatherers to Global Production in Africa.2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All societies must manage their water resources. From the early civilizations of the Indus valley, nearly 5,000 years ago, to today’s megacities, meeting the water needs of an urban population remains a perpetual task. How a society manages and controls its water resources - whether for food and farming, drinking, sanitation, power or transport – plays a formative role in its development. And never more so than in our own century, with the global population approaching seven billion and the continuing threat of climate change.

    As concerns over global water resources continue to grow, the pioneering History of Water series brings a much needed historical perspective to the relationship between water and society. Covering all aspects of water and society - social, cultural, political, religious and technological - the volumes reveal how water issues can only be fully understood when all aspects are properly integrated. Unprecedented in its geographical coverage and unrivalled in its multidisciplinary span, the History of Water series makes a unique and original contribution to a key contemporary issue.

  • 84.
    Oestigaard, Terje
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Agrarian Change, Property and Resources.
    Tvedt, Terje
    Urban Water Systems: A Conceptual Framework2014In: A History of Water. Series 3, Vol. 1.: Water and Urbanization / [ed] Terje Tvedt and Terje Oestigaard, London ; New York: I.B. Tauris, 2014, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Ondjaki,
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Sandels, Marianne
    Ondjaki - stories and lessons2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Angolan author Ondjaki discusses stories and the lessons of life with Marianne Sandels.

  • 86.
    Owuor, Yvonne A.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Conflict, Displacement and Transformation.
    Contemporary projections: Africa in the literature of Atrocity (Aftrocity)2009In: Writers, writing on conflicts and wars in Africa, London: Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd. and Nordiska Afrikainstitutet , 2009, p. 17-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Palmberg, Mai
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Cultural Images and Expressions.
    What’s culture got to do with it?: A report from a conference June 15-18, 2009 in Uppsala2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What’s culture got to do with it? was the name of an international conference on June 15-18, 2009 in Uppsala, organisedby the 'Cultural Images in and of Africa' research programmeat the Nordic Africa Institute, and funded by the Riksbankens jubileumsfond and Statens kulturråd in Sweden. Scholars participated from 15 countries and 36 universities or research institutes, with 10 African countries represented. This report reproduces the keynote speeches of Karin Barber, Elleke Boehmer, Stefan Jonsson, and Signe Arnfred. The rapporteurs summarise the presentation and discussion of the 27 papers selected for the conference. The report also contain pictorial memories from the conference, and poetry by the three Nordic Africa Institute guest writers present.

  • 88.
    Palmberg, Mai
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Cultural Images and Expressions.
    Backström, Carita
    Introduktion [till Kultur i Afrika: bildkonst, film, teater, musik, litteratur och dans]2010In: Kultur i Afrika: bildkonst, film, teater, musik, litteratur och dans, Stockholm ; Uppsala: Tranan ; Nordiska Afrikainstitutet , 2010, p. 7-12Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett annorlunda möte med Afrika genom dess samtida konst och kultur. Här hörs afrikanska röster från de senaste årtiondens litteratur, teater, musik, dans, film och bildkonst. Det handlar om drömmar, kärlek och svek, Afrikas kulturarv, mångdubbla identiteter, maktfullkomliga härskare, världens tillstånd och frågor om tradition och modernitet. Redaktörerna har valt material från möten med utövande konstnärer och inbjudit forskare till översikter och analyser. Tips på böcker, internetsidor, tidskrifter och kulturfestivaler för nya vandringar i Afrikas kultur finns i slutet av boken.

    

  • 89.
    Palmberg, Mai
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Cultural Images and Expressions.
    Backström, Carita
    Kultur i Afrika: Bildkonst, film, teater, musik, litteratur och dans2010Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett annorlunda möte med Afrika genom dess samtida konst och kultur. Här hörs afrikanska röster från de senaste årtiondens litteratur, teater, musik, dans, film och bildkonst. Det handlar om drömmar, kärlek och svek, Afrikas kulturarv, mångdubbla identiteter, maktfullkomliga härskare, världens tillstånd och frågor om tradition och modernitet. Redaktörerna har valt material från möten med utövande konstnärer och inbjudit forskare till översikter och analyser. Tips på böcker, internetsidor, tidskrifter och kulturfestivaler för nya vandringar i Afrikas kultur finns i slutet av boken.

  • 90. Puumala, Eeva
    et al.
    Kynsilehto, Anitta
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Migration, mobility and transnational relations.
    Does the body matter?: Determining the right to asylum and the corporeality of political communication2015In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Rampolokeng, Lesego
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Isaksson, Roy
    Ensamhetens hud: Dambudzo Marechera (1955-1987) is the African literature’s enfant terrible2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Ruuth-Bäcker, Karin
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    En litterär resa genom det svarta Afrika: en bibliografisk vägledning till afrikansk skönlitteratur1981Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett bra sätt, kanske t o m det bästa sättet, att skaffa sig kunskap om och förståelse för ett främmande lands kultur, tänkesätt och levnadsförhållanden är att läsa landets skönlitteratur. När det gäller afrikansk skönlitteratur kan det kanske ibland vara svårt att i Sverige skaffa sig en överblick över den rika litteratur som faktiskt finns. För att göra det lättare att orientera sig i afrikansk skönlitteratur har därför Nordiska afrikainstitutet producerat denna lilla vägledning.

  • 93.
    Sjögren, Anders
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Conflict, Displacement and Transformation.
    Land, Mobility and Belonging in West Africa by Carola Lentz (review)2014In: Anthropological Quarterly, ISSN 0003-5491, E-ISSN 1534-1518, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 1325-1328Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Sjöstedt, Jonas
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Thunberg, Lena
    Brotten i Västsahara2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Tidigare EU-parlamentarikern Jonas Sjöstedt samtalar med Lena Thunberg, redaktör för tidskriften ‘Västsahara’, om Sjöstedts kriminalroman 'Sahara' som utspelar sig i det ockuperade Västsahara samt EU.

  • 95.
    Skrydstrup, Martin
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Repatriating African artefacts : a preliminary draft : with particular reference to the ethnographic holdings in the Nordic countries2000Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 96. Stern, Maria
    et al.
    Eriksson Baaz, Maria
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Conflict, Displacement and Transformation. Göteborgs universitet.
    Telling Perpetrator’s stories: a reflection on effects and ethics2015In: Teaching About Rape in War and Genocide / [ed] edited by John K. Roth, Carol Rittner, London: Palgrave , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Söderberg, Bertil
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Widman, Ragnar
    Kikongo1966Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 98.
    Söderberg, Bertil
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Widman, Ragnar
    Publications en kikongo: bibliographie relative aux contributions suédoises entre 1885 et 19701978Book (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Tadjo, Véronique
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Talking drums and picture magic2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Word artist and illustrator and Véronique Tadjo presents her youth novel about Nelson Mandela and her new novel Away from my Father.

  • 100.
    Theorell, Anita
    The Nordic Africa Institute.
    Africa has the floor2011Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Contents: HENNING MANKELL/HAS/THE/FLOOR -- VERONIQUE TADJO/HAS/THE/FLOOR -- THE/AUTHORS: -- CHRIS ABANI -- LUBNA AL-HUSSEIN -- MESHACK ASARE -- SEFI ATTA -- EDEM AWUMEY-- GABEBA BADEROON -- YABA BADOE -- DOREEN BAINGANA -- BIYI BANDELE -- LESLEY BEAKE -- SIHEM BENSEDRINE -- MAÏSSA BEY -- PAULINA CHIZIANE -- MIA COUTO -- BERNADETTE SANOU DAO -- LASSANA IGO DIARRA -- OUSMANE DIARRA -- BOUBACAR BORIS DIOP -- UNITY DOW -- NAWAL EL SAADAWI -- CHRISTIAN EPANYA -- NURUDDIN FARAH -- PETINA GRAPPAH -- NADINE GORDIMER -- MIGUEL GULLANDER -- PIET GROBLER -- HELON HABILA -- JAY HEALE -- AYAAN HIRSI ALI -- CHENJERAI HOVE -- PHILO IKONYA -- BRIAN JAMES -- TAHAR BEN JELLOUN -- BILLY KAHORA -- FATOU KEÏTA -- JOHN KILAKA -- ELIESHI LEMA -- ALAIN MABANCKOU -- SINDIWE MAGONA -- KOPANO MATLWA -- DESBELE MEHARI -- MAAZA MENGISTE -- DEON MEYER -- BIENVENU SENA MONGABE -- GEOFFREY MUSONDA -- WAMBUI MWANGI -- DOMINIQUE MWANKUMI -- EYOUM N’GANGUE -- CLETUS NELSON NWADIKE -- MONICA ARAC DE NYENKO -- TOLU OGUNLESI -- ONDJAKI -- SHAILJA PATEL -- WUMI RAJI -- LESEGO RAMPOLOKENG -- IRENE SABATINI -- ISMAIL SERAGELDIN -- STEEVE SASSENE -- JONATHAN SHAPIRO -- PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN -- VERONIQUE TADJO -- MPHO TUTU -- NGUGI WA THIONG’O -- BINYAVANGA WAINAINA -- SENAYIT WORKU

123 51 - 100 of 118
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf